111

You won't win any fashion contests, but that's not what you're aiming for anyway. I can't tell you anything about East Asia, but I've travelled plenty around Europe (including Eastern Europe). Jeans might be more common, but there's absolutely nothing unusual or inappropriate about wearing sweatpants for a flight, regardless of your gender. It certainly won'...


30

Wear trousers without metal and by preference ones that stay up without a belt. It is not a given that you will not be checked but it will make it less likely and you will feel better when you are standing there. Take everything out your pockets, including hankies and odd pieces of paper. You can put them in your bag or a coat you take off and send through ...


29

You want clothing that appears invisible to the millimeter wave scanner, so you appear naked i.e. no false positives. Any metal will obviously show up, but anomalies in fabric density can also appear as a suspicious object. When I travel I avoid: Velcro fasteners, Cargo pockets (multiple layers), Tucking in my shirt (rumples), Baggy clothing or ...


24

I haven't traveled to east Asia or East Europe before but that is a very long flight, I don't think jeans are comfortable at all for that many hours. I have though traveled to central Europe several times and have never worn anything other than sweatpants and nothing has happened, even though they usually don't trust travelers from my country easily. It ...


22

In the Nordic countries, we use a layered clothing method, which has the benefit of being adjustable to the weather: First layer: Moisture-wickening technical underclothing Long underpants Long sleeve undershirt Thin socks Second layer: Warm and breathable Fleece jacket and underpants, wool socks Thin wool gloves Third layer: Outer shell Windproof but ...


20

It all depends on where you are from. Being from east Europe myself - we'd put our most official nice clothes for even going to the store literally 2 steps from the house. Having lived in the UK for 8 years now, I've realized how stupid this is, and more importantly, no one cares how you look, in a setting where that is not the most important thing. I'd ...


17

Winter mountain night temperatures are comparable with the temperature inside a freezer. Daytime temperatures are no higher than those inside a fridge but can be lower and feel lower still. You will need serious winter clothes, meant for serious winter weather. And if you are from a warm climate you need extra layers over what locals would wear. Long ...


17

I traveled for Work a lot! I mean a lot. I used to wear Jeans and a Shirt. With the whole getup (belt, nice shoes, etc.). After 50+ trips, I couldn't do it anymore. Not only was I never on-site first day at the client. There was absolutely no reason to wear what I did. You have to take off the belt/watch for the TSA. Untie the nice shoes and whatever else ...


14

This will not help you this week, but if you're eligible to do so, you could sign up for TSA Pre✓ (or another program like Global Entry, if you travel internationally, that includes the same benefits). Precheck lanes at most airports have regular metal detectors, not millimeter wave scanners, so they're unaffected by how your pants fit. There is no ...


10

I used to have the same problem, needing secondary screening about 60% of the time. Now, after I enter the scanner but before I raise my arms, I pull my pants up and forwards, so at least there's contact with my hips and lower back. Usually it'll hold there long enough for the scan to complete. Since I've been doing that I've never had any secondary ...


7

It depends how long you are staying outside, as tourist I recommend: [I was there several time] On top, 3 layers are often enough (shirt, pullover, winter jacket), bottom: 2 layers (you can do also with one layer [jeans], as I do it, but if you do not move, depending of winds, it can be cold, I do not recommend it). As shoes: I recommend the moonboot: ...


7

I have been on various long flights (EU<>Asia, EU<>US) and would recommend you to wear whatever fits you best. Sweatpants are incredibly comfortable, so go for it. What I recommend as well: Wear good shoes, no flipflops or sandals. In the unlikely event of an emergency this might save your life. Take shoes without laces. The same holds true for ...


6

Russian apartment almost universally has a washing machine. This means when you rent an apartment (via AirBnB or even Booking or by googling "квартиры посуточно {city}", the apartment will usually have an operable washing machine and some detergent. If you ask for it in advance you can arrange apartment with washing machine confidently. So your best bet is ...


6

Your brother's best bet is to take extra layers of shirts and pants, any thermals, any gloves and hats you possibly already own, as well as the thickest coat you can find and use this as initial clothing for entry into Harbin China, and then ditch it for better local winter gear once you leave the airport or checkin to your destination. If your brother ...


6

(according to the precision you just made) It is difficult to answer. If you just want to go up the mountain, look around, take a couple of pictures, you don't need the whole layers thing and technical winter equipments; you will not stay out that long. I would have regular winter boots; I don't think you will want to venture out and hike; so no need for ...


6

Wear a kilt. The last two times I've flown, I wore a kilt, and (even after being frisked) could have smuggled an inflated beach ball through security.


5

It's winter and the elevation of Titlis is 3238 meter. That means the temperatures will be far below 0° C, and it might snow. Bring winter clothes (i.e. a thick jacket, hiking boots if you have them) or ski clothes if you want to go skiing.


5

Yes! Estonia is actually awesome for thrift shopping for clothes! There are actually lots of used clothes shops here in Tallinn and the prices are low and the quality is high. There is even a chain of stores called Humana, including some which are Humana Vintage, which I suppose sell more collectible or designer stuff. At the moment Humana is selling ...


5

I grew up in Winnipeg (not as far north as Yellowknife, but we had our share of weather below -30°C) and now I live in New England. If I was about to spend significant time outdoors in Winnipeg in the severe cold, and I had an unlimited budget to buy clothing for it, here's what I would wear: A parka with a hood. Thigh-length if possible. Natural or ...


4

Cloth Drawstring As others have noted, metal will often get you flagged. For this reason, if you need to wear pants with some type of suspension, you should definitely opt for something like sweat pants with a cloth drawstring. Of course, there are many belts which have no metal parts, but if your pants have a zipper or button or any metal fasteners, then ...


4

Back in the old days when gate attendants had a lot of leeway in deciding who to upgrade if necessary (economy overbooked, spaces in business) then wearing smarter clothing was one potential point in your favor. These days upgrades are so rigidly prioritized based on Frequent Flyer status, ticket bought etc that it is almost certainly not relevant. But if ...


4

To add at least one anecdote about East Asia: I have flown from Paris to Tokyo and back in Sweatpants and had a normal experience. No comments, stares or anything like that. Neither border agents nor flight attendents will look at you funny. They are used to people wearing whatever is most comfortable, especially on a long haul flight such as yours. ...


4

Renting just books is unlikely, although there's no reason why if that were a frequent request. Definitely, having rain boots to visit Uyuni is a good idea if during the rainy season. Although personally I went during that season, that year they were experiencing a drought, so it was quite dry! Buying daily items in Bolivia is very cheap, so it is possible ...


3

There is one important case no one covered in which you need to dress up for a flight. If you're getting extremely discounted tickets because you or a relative works for an airline, then most airlines have a dress code which will apply to you. A recent example of this was the two girls who were denied boarding on a United Airlines flight for wearing ...


3

While not a frequent traveler, I have gone through airport security at least 20 times with a LOT of stuff in and attached to the outside of my bags that I would think would warrant additional screening. However, I dress very... hoboish, and have never needed a patdown. What I mean by that is sweatpants, a single plain white undershirt, and a plain weather ...


2

Unfortunately, sometimes, you're just out of luck. I fly often enough and I've definitely had unpleasant experiences, including being touched, um, yeah, there. Under my underwear (if you ask me that would be sexual assault in any other scenario). But generally, I've managed to keep those experiences to a minimum by following certain rules that I've conjured ...


2

Don't wear underwire bras Okay, maybe not very useful for you per se, but for other people. I tend to get frisked due to underwires that are likely somewhat larger than on average female traveller. Personally, I don't think there is fireproof way to avoid patdowns though, so I don't have better answer for what to wear.


2

On many long-haul flights where sleeping is expected the airlines will provide pajamas to their first-class passengers. Flying used to be special and something that very few people did and, as a result, people often dressed up for their flights. Today, flying is often seen as a chore and just a convenient way of getting from one place to another. We've gone ...


2

I travelled from Europe to New Zealand las April, wich were 2 10+ hour flights, so I had lots of doubts about what to do. So I asked a friend that travels overseas a lot for work and he told me to wear some jeans but pack a sweatpants on my hand luggage, on takeoff wait for the seatbelts signal to switch off and change to the sweatpants and change back to ...


1

There are two issues here: 1) Comfort -- the issue which has been addressed by most other answers. I must confess that I often take flights from Europe to China or Australia/NZ -- often with three legs to the flight and spanning two days. It's no great discomfort to travel in a business suit as I often have to go to work immediately on arrival. 2) Border ...


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