30

Most schools will let you know how much money to give for the trip. Most of the time they will also tell how, cash, card or other methods. How much depends on what the kids have to pay, how much you allow as extra money and you will likely adjust the method to the amount. If it is just a small amount, for some souvenirs and the odd snack, cash in euros is ...


8

It depends on the fare type. If this is an "Advance" ticket - an inflexible ticket which requires you to travel on a specific train - then this is not, in theory, valid. There is, of course, the possibility of station staff taking pity on you, but it's not something you should rely on. If, on the other hand, you're buying flexible tickets - (Super) ...


8

In most european countries, both cards and cash are widely accepted. However, "cards" means bank cards, not credit cards. Many smaller shops do not accept credit cards. So unless you can provide a european bank card (Girocard, EC-Card), cash is your best option. France is not one of the few countries where cash is going away, though the Corona ...


5

So I have been to a few school trips in foreign countries (Tho only one with a foreign currency) and my school always advised our parents to give us cash. Its easier to spot how much one has left and many smaller stores or bakeries don't accept credit card in Europe. For the amount: I was given 100 pounds for 6 1/2 days in Great Britain about 7 years ago.


3

You write that you are 13 and that you have arranged a place. Under German law, your legal guardians have the right and duty to supervise your location in accordance with your age and maturity. They don't have to watch a 13-year-old every minute, but they do have to know and agree with your plan. As a German citizen, you need no visa. You do need a written ...


3

Your newborn is a US citizen, and 18 USC §1185 requires US citizens to bear a valid US passport for entry into (and exit from) the US. Airlines know this, and will refuse to board her onto a flight to the US unless she has a valid US passport. That she is a dual citizen of the US and another country is irrelevant. As a US citizen, the airline will apply the ...


2

It's not an ideal layout and I don't think there is a single right answer. I would probably go with two rows in the middle and seat kids and parents diagonally. So you have one parent sitting next to the kid (although with limited physical access) and the other before or behind, i.e. they can quickly have full access to the child through the same isle if ...


1

Just looking at the diagram and photo, I'd say across-the-aisle is what you want. Consider this: If you're seated in the middle next to a child also in the middle, and that child decides to get up and run around, how are you going to get over to the other aisle to handle it? If I were you, I'd pick two rows with seats across the aisle from each other, and ...


1

It becomes more common in the last time. Especially big malls or shops with a big catchment area add this to their services. From own experience I know "IKEA" and "Möbel Gruber" (in the category "big shop") and "West Park" (see "Paradies") (in the category "shopping mall") to have staffed children'...


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