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3

That should be an issue between the airlines, and spelled out in the contract they made with each other. It could be anything - whatever they decided to contract on. Either way, it should not be your problem - whoever took your money is responsible for fulfilling the contract with you - or pay it back.


2

I've had the same thing and have been driven mad trying to figure out if I inadvertently booked through an OTA... was so sure I hadn't! Anyway, after not being able to submit the OTA form (it said it didn't recognise the details) I went on their online chat and said "I booked my flight through ryannair, how do I get a refund?". It then asked me if ...


1

The end result here was that Emirates updated their policy, allowing 100% refunds for all COVID cancellations. This coincided with the cancellation of the remaining legs on my ticket which were not cancelled initially, hence I was able to leverage the Emirates policy and did not have to fall back on EC 261 rules to claim a refund. The refund request was ...


4

This is tricky and Covid makes it even more so. Typically a refund is owed by whoever took your payment. Take a look on your credit card: If the payee is Opodo, you should primarily talk to them. If it's BA, they are your primary target. This really depends on the contract between BA and Opodo and type of booking, so you should check. Partial refunds are ...


1

Unfortunately this depends a lot on the details of your specific ticket. I'll answer it assuming you actually have a layover in the Netherlands so that EU 261 applies. Do airlines usually issue a ticket refund in case of cancellations due to COVID? In most countries they are legally required to give you full refund. However, many airlines will try to ...


1

Yes, most of the times. In my experience 5 times they did (All international flights in the past 3 months), 1 time they didn't (national flight within Argentina). Emirates and Qatar airlines did it automatically, Gol airlines (Brazil) I had to insist until they did it. I guess Lufthansa will do it without hesitation, but I could be wrong. The time I went ...


3

No, usually they won't do so willingly; however, with flights departing from an EU/Schengen state, or arriving in an EU/Schengen state on an EU/Schengen country's carrier, they're obliegd to per the EC261 regulation if no flights of their own are available and the passenger insists on re-routing rather than reimbursement. Had this happen with a Eurowings ...


7

This is definitely possible, but I wouldn't recommend expecting it. Most major airlines have what are known as interline agreements which include provisions for transferring passengers in the case of irregular operations (i.e. flight delays or cancellations.) These are especially common for airlines within a given alliance, but also commonly exist among ...


18

Do they sometimes do it? Yes. Can you count on it? No. Unless there are specific regulations in some countries that require it (not the case in most major markets I know of), airlines don’t have an obligation to do so. So it’s purely a business decision. If you are a valued customer (frequent flyer with status and/or travelling in premium classes and/or with ...


5

It depends on the airlines and the local market. I was once stuck in Denver and saw United customer rep rebook people on Delta, American and even phoning a Southwest agent. I was once stuck in Toronto and an Air Canada agent wouldn’t even rebook me on UA (a *A partner). I once missed a connection in Munich and Lufthansa rebooked me on a later Czech Airlines ...


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