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49

Norway has a very extensive right-to-roam called allemannsrett. From the website of the Norwegian Environment Agency: In open country in the lowlands, you can pitch a tent and camp overnight for up to 48 hours in one location without prior permission from the landowner. In the mountains, and in remote, sparsely populated areas, you may camp for longer ...


38

In Finland/Sweden/Norway/Iceland you are allowed to do this by law as long as you stay away from houses and use common sense like you say. It is literally translated as 'every mans rights' (See also this question on Travel-SE for more information). In the summer these countries are perfect for this kind of holiday and I can recommend it to you very much. In ...


34

France Wild camping is allowed except in specific protected places, depicted here: Anyway there are many local rules, so the best is to find the city hall of the village where you want to camp and ask there. An alternative to city hall is church, where the priest might be able to tell you whether the local church owns some field in the country side. If ...


33

What's called a refuge in French is a Hütte in German. In both cases, it can be staffed (gardé, bewirtschaftet) and possibly offer some basic catering or be unstaffed (refuge non gardé, Selbstversorgerhütte) or a mere shelter (cabane or abri de secours, Notlager or Biwakschachtel). The German and Austrian alpine clubs run many of them and also maintain ...


31

It depends. Assuming that you don't exceed any size limits, airlines are still often cautious when it comes to any kind of straps, even loose straps on a plain rucksack, or any other dangling parts from checked luggage. The airline may require you to wrap your rucksack in plastic foil to contain any loose ends. Both in Gatwick and in Bergen, there are ...


24

Allemansrätten, or Every person's right, is a freedom in Sweden which states that everyone must have access to nature. As far as I remember, there are similar rules in other Nordic countries, but I'm not familiar with the specifics. Naturvårdsverket is the Swedish environmental protection agency that regulates the access to nature. You can read the rules at ...


24

The "Visit Iceland" website has a page about your rights to camp in Iceland. Camping with no more than three tents is allowed on uncultivated ground for a single night, unless the landowner has posted a notice to the contrary. However, campers should always use designated campsites where they do exist. Do not camp close to farms without permission. If a ...


23

Check out Freagle. Freagle is like couchsurfing, instead of your couch you can offer your backyard, barn... It's not wild camping per se but it is trying to fill the gap between the illegal wild camping and the normal camp site. And indeed, not so many hosts available. Still worth a try. My own experience with wild camping in Germany is positive if you ...


22

Japan does not have a general "right to access" like Scandinavian countries, wild camping on public land is theoretically illegal and wild camping on private property requires the landowner's permission. That said, both rules are only loosely enforced and there's a bit of a tradition of "urban camping" (野宿 nojuku) in Japan: simply put, if you pitch up a ...


19

Certainly, there are lots of campsites in Finland. Even better, Finland has the concept of 'jokamiehenoikeus' or freedom to roam, and : "One may stay or set up camp temporarily in the countryside, a reasonable distance from homes, pick mineral samples, wild berries, mushrooms and flowers (as long as they are not protected species)." What you might ...


18

I've investigated related topic for the bicycle trip over Italy, and I can say this: There are many camping zones where you can easily stay for the night and even get a tent for rent. You can easily find such camping by internet, and choose ones matching your criteria. About tolerance - remember one thing: If there any fence, rope, metal wire or something ...


18

In Scotland, UK you are legally allowed to camp on privately owned fields that don't have crops. Scotland does not have a law of trespass - although camp on military land at your peril. The rest of the UK (England, Wales and Northern Ireland) do not have this freedom, you legally have to go to campsites. In Ireland you do not have the legal right to roam (...


18

Here's a similar summary for Finland, with a PDF brochure giving more details. It's pretty similar to the Swedish rules, with a few minor differences: Certain types of fishing (angling without reel, ice fishing) are allowed without permit. Open fires are not allowed without the landowner's permission, except in emergencies.


17

The Netherlands certainly doesn't have that many public taps as other countries. Maybe also because the regular tap water is of very good quality. But the recent years more and more taps are placed. Mostly to advertise against bottled water, and help people who use own (recycled) bottles. I know of two websites / apps which have a map of taps: ...


16

I was really curious now and that's why I just had a call with a woman from the Bundesamt für Umwelt, the official federal office that is responsible for tourism in Switzerland. The woman was a little bit suprised about my question but was very kind. She told me that generally wild camping is not allowed in Switzerland (and Liechtenstein). But this law is ...


16

In general wild camping is illegal in Germany. However I could find where you can do it, but not for free. Trekiking-pfalz.de offers 10 camping places for up to 6 tents, the price for one tent is 10 EUR / night. You're allowed to stay on one place only for a night and then you have to move along. On their website there are some recommended routes, and there ...


16

No airline requires you to check "a bag". As long as you are within the size, weight, and content restrictions, you can check pretty much check anything you want. What you (and them) want to avoid are dangling parts (straps, etc.) possible part separation (after all, there is a single tag for the whole thing). Both points are easily solved by putting ...


14

Wild camping is not allowed in Germany; you have to go to a campsite. From what I have heard, it's more tolerated in Eastern Europe, and no problem in Norway and Sweden.


14

There are many places in Spain where you can camp, on the beach for example, if you are careful about bringing drinking water. Friends have travelled across Spain without ever stopping at a formal site. The small villages in the Sierra Nevadas will mostly allow you to sleep in the vicinity, and it is possible that this is also true for the rest of Spain. ...


14

You might get forcibly evicted by the police. This could include any of these further downsides: You might be the target of tear gas. You might be the target of water canon. Your tent and gear could get damaged. If one side is perceived as becoming violent, the other side may also become violent. You could feel the sting of a police baton. If you are ...


14

I've always found Wunderground to be pretty useful for travel planning. You can look up the almanac data for any given day. This link has today's data for nearby Biarritz. In addition, their travel planner has the ability to look up the historical weather for a given stretch of time. This link shows an example of the data for Biarritz from October 1 ...


14

Well here is the straight scoop from the guy who has lived here and run the place for 31 years. National Park Service regulations state that there is no road-side camping along Zzyzx Road, nor at our facility here at the California State University Desert Studies Center. Visitors are asked to park at the Park Service "Orientation Center" parking lot near the ...


14

You can camp on "out-land", which is anything not maintained/cultivated like lawns, fields, etc. I don't think ownership is an issue (no land is not owned). In "low-land" (<200m above sea level?) you can only camp (raise a tent) for two days in the same place, in the "high-land" (everything else) there is no limit. https://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


13

If you are going to "occupy" Auckland, you are de facto part of their cause. You're in for the demonstrations, the speeches, music, and any other activities that comprise the event. And you're subject to any backlash that group encounters: civil disobedience, counter demonstrations, police, legal action, etc. The upside is that, if it's a lawful assembly, ...


13

I would not recommend a tent if you want to see the cities and rely on public transport: campsites are generally outside the city, near woods, lakes or the sea, since they are intended for recreation; unlike in the states or Australia where some people live there permanently and this also means there wont be much public transport near campsites Leave your ...


13

There's good news and bad news. The good news - you CAN camp anywhere, except the church land, private gardens and near water reservoirs. We researched this in 2008 and found many, many resources online saying it's perfectly fine to camp even on the side of the road. We even checked this with locals in Novosibirsk when we got there. However, they ...


13

As a french hiker often going camping, here is what I know. In France, camping is regulated by the law named « Camping, aménagement des parcs résidentiels de loisirs, implantation des habitations légères de loisirs et installation des résidences mobiles de loisirs et des caravanes » from the « décret n° 2015-1783 du 28 décembre 2015 relatif à la partie ...


13

Probably not This is a rather vague half-answer, but it's more than a comment. Through the commercial tourism association http://www.schwarzwald-tourismus.info/ I found the different organisations that take care of the national parks/reserves there. They are all listed in the footer of that page. I called the one for the north and asked. They said their ...


12

It turned out there was a campground just a couple of minutes walk from the KTEL bus station where I posted my question from! It didn't show up when I used Google Web or Maps for "camping" or "campground". I fluked finding it by Googling for "Lonely Planet Ioannina" where they listed its name and no other details. Then Googling for its name led to some ...


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