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50

Norway has a very extensive right-to-roam called allemannsrett. From the website of the Norwegian Environment Agency: In open country in the lowlands, you can pitch a tent and camp overnight for up to 48 hours in one location without prior permission from the landowner. In the mountains, and in remote, sparsely populated areas, you may camp for longer than ...


41

TL;DR: You can, possibly, in some places, but it may not be a great idea. Whether it is legal depends on the Bundesland (state) — to put it simply, the federal government has no authority in these matters, and each state put down their own rules. There are federal rules for entry into Germany, but these don't apply as you are already in the country. ...


33

What's called a refuge in French is a Hütte in German. In both cases, it can be staffed (gardé, bewirtschaftet) and possibly offer some basic catering or be unstaffed (refuge non gardé, Selbstversorgerhütte) or a mere shelter (cabane or abri de secours, Notlager or Biwakschachtel). The German and Austrian alpine clubs run many of them and also maintain ...


31

It depends. Assuming that you don't exceed any size limits, airlines are still often cautious when it comes to any kind of straps, even loose straps on a plain rucksack, or any other dangling parts from checked luggage. The airline may require you to wrap your rucksack in plastic foil to contain any loose ends. Both in Gatwick and in Bergen, there are ...


24

Check out Freagle. Freagle is like couchsurfing, instead of your couch you can offer your backyard, barn... It's not wild camping per se but it is trying to fill the gap between the illegal wild camping and the normal camp site. And indeed, not so many hosts available. Still worth a try. My own experience with wild camping in Germany is positive if you ...


22

Japan does not have a general "right to access" like Scandinavian countries, wild camping on public land is theoretically illegal and wild camping on private property requires the landowner's permission. That said, both rules are only loosely enforced and there's a bit of a tradition of "urban camping" (野宿 nojuku) in Japan: simply put, if you pitch up a ...


21

Well here is the straight scoop from the guy who has lived here and run the place for 31 years. National Park Service regulations state that there is no road-side camping along Zzyzx Road, nor at our facility here at the California State University Desert Studies Center. Visitors are asked to park at the Park Service "Orientation Center" parking lot near the ...


19

Certainly, there are lots of campsites in Finland. Even better, Finland has the concept of 'jokamiehenoikeus' or freedom to roam, and : "One may stay or set up camp temporarily in the countryside, a reasonable distance from homes, pick mineral samples, wild berries, mushrooms and flowers (as long as they are not protected species)." What you might ...


17

In general wild camping is illegal in Germany. However I could find where you can do it, but not for free. Trekiking-pfalz.de offers 10 camping places for up to 6 tents, the price for one tent is 10 EUR / night. You're allowed to stay on one place only for a night and then you have to move along. On their website there are some recommended routes, and there ...


17

The Netherlands certainly doesn't have that many public taps as other countries. Maybe also because the regular tap water is of very good quality. But the recent years more and more taps are placed. Mostly to advertise against bottled water, and help people who use own (recycled) bottles. I know of two websites / apps which have a map of taps: ...


16

No airline requires you to check "a bag". As long as you are within the size, weight, and content restrictions, you can check pretty much check anything you want. What you (and them) want to avoid are dangling parts (straps, etc.) possible part separation (after all, there is a single tag for the whole thing). Both points are easily solved by putting ...


16

Summary: longer bike tours come with a lot of contacts. Almost all these can be avoided by doing short tours since you can take all your supplies with you for a day or two. This still leaves you 50 - 150 km x 360° from where you are in non-contact-mode. Long version: Being in "no contact, but go out and get some fresh air and sun on your own" Hesse the ...


15

You can camp on "out-land", which is anything not maintained/cultivated like lawns, fields, etc. I don't think ownership is an issue (no land is not owned). In "low-land" (<200m above sea level?) you can only camp (raise a tent) for two days in the same place, in the "high-land" (everything else) there is no limit. https://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


14

I've always found Wunderground to be pretty useful for travel planning. You can look up the almanac data for any given day. This link has today's data for nearby Biarritz. In addition, their travel planner has the ability to look up the historical weather for a given stretch of time. This link shows an example of the data for Biarritz from October 1 ...


13

As a french hiker often going camping, here is what I know. In France, camping is regulated by the law named « Camping, aménagement des parcs résidentiels de loisirs, implantation des habitations légères de loisirs et installation des résidences mobiles de loisirs et des caravanes » from the « décret n° 2015-1783 du 28 décembre 2015 relatif à la partie ...


13

Probably not This is a rather vague half-answer, but it's more than a comment. Through the commercial tourism association http://www.schwarzwald-tourismus.info/ I found the different organisations that take care of the national parks/reserves there. They are all listed in the footer of that page. I called the one for the north and asked. They said their ...


12

According to this page wild camping is illegal in Germany, but what is allowed is "overnight parking". The distinction is that overnight parking just means you are parking in a regular parking lot and not setting up a table outside your vehicle or anything similar.


12

It is possible, but not legal. Other questions have already addressed the illegality of wild camping in Germany, and offer some alternatives if you don't want to violate the law. However, if you're in a remote place, high up in the mountains, or otherwise in a place where people do not pass by, and you are very well-behaved, the chances of being caught may ...


12

From FaroeIslands.com: Camping There are no public wilder­ness or common areas in the Faroes. As a consequence, camping is only permitted at designated camp­sites (See page 88). Moreover, it is not permitted to stay overnight in your camp­ing cars along the road, at rest stops, lay-bys or view areas. Be aware that many camping sites are de­...


12

Ok. I'm taking no liability for what follows, ok? In Italy free camping is permitted, maybe. Italian law define camping as the building of a fixed tent structure for no more than 48 hours, and bivouac as the staying in a tent structure overnight. At a national level italian law allows for camping and bivouacking. Then another law (D. Lgs. 31/3/1998 n. 112)...


11

Wild camping is permissible as long as you maintain a respectful distance from homes etc, but in some places it might difficult to find good spots to put up a tent close to the road. Based on my experience, the best spots are found taking side roads a little bit off the main ring road. Near populated areas you can usually find official camping sites (check ...


11

AFAIK almost every forest/unoccupied land in Germany is private property and therefore legally off-limits. But I have often camped wild as resident with tent in Germany and never ever experienced problems. Conditions: You are camping in a forest which is really big enough. Noone likes uninvited campers in direct vicinity. An option is to ask a farmer if ...


11

No. Any open fire requires a permit. A campsite might operate a communal campfire on special occasions, but guests are not allowed to light their own campfires. Reference: Icelandic Tourist Board, guidelines for campsites, section 5.7: http://www.ferdamalastofa.is/static/files/upload/files/Tjaldsvaedarit_2006.pdf Það er stranglega bannað að kveikja eld ...


11

I tend to use WeatherSpark to look up historical data. Their main mode is kind of interactive browser (which is fun to play with by itself), but they also generate averages reports for all places their system knows about. It's a little hard to pinpoint accurate location from your description, since Basque Country seems to more eagerly jump to Spain parts in ...


11

As with most things about travel in the U.S., the answer varies from state to state and from city to city. Yes, broadly speaking, it's possible to travel in the United States without paying for lodging, but I would not say it is especially easy or comfortable. There are many campsites where the fee is quite nominal (under $20), budget motels in rural areas, ...


11

Recreation.gov lists camping and RV sites at U.S. national parks, forests and other federal land. The nightly fee shown is per site, and you're allowed up to the maximum number of people shown for that site. (I've stayed at quite a few of these campgrounds.) When you actually go to book your campsite, the web site will tell you the maximum number of people ...


11

You do not need to reserve in advance unless you really want a specific camping. Not everyone reserves a spot, as that often costs money. Not reserving is a risk, but a small one. I often go to France without a reservation, like I did two weeks back. It's relatively easy to find a spot, especially if you are willing to camping-hop. That is not required at ...


11

In short: No. Although of course, for "can" in its literal meaning, it's "yes". First, hotels and the like are presently not allowed to accept you, as are camping sites, so you would necessarily have to do the equivalent of "wild camping". Which is your initial premise, too, if I understood right. Also, and more importantly, doing a tour across the ...


10

Wild camping is not allowed in Romania, there is a law (Legea 54/2012 privind desfasurarea activitatilor de picnic) which does not allow it. But... yes, it is still tolerated. A special attention at the natural reservations (The Danube Delta in particular). An interactive map with camping sites in Romania as well as a downloadable guide can be found here: ...


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