Hot answers tagged

197

TL;DR: If you know you're going, and there's a fare you can afford, book it. Waiting will almost never save you money, and never enough to offset paying double or triple the cheapo fare because you waited too long. Detailed explanation, with pictures: The problem is that there is no single "the price" that goes up and down. On any given flight you can buy ...


93

International first (and business) class for long flights is a very different product than most domestic first class services. For example, here's first class on a United domestic 737: Wikimedia Commons: LuccaV Here's "business class" on short-haul Lufthansa (simply an economy seat with the seat next to you blocked off to give you more room) Flickr: ...


80

Short answer: No, you will not get such a discount. Longer answer: For any significantly-sized airliner, the commodity they have to sell you is floor space in the cabin, not weight. If you're occupying one seat of the same size, you're costing the airline almost exactly the same as someone who weighs twice what you do. Let's consider some numbers: ...


75

It's hard to understand why this can be the case without some background in how airline fares work, so lets start with a bit of background... For each route, airlines will publish a number of different fares, each with a distinct "fare code" - normally with weird names like "TANRKL", "YSJWNN" or "X34Q". Corresponding to these fare codes are "fare rules" ...


60

I recently travelled for 6 months through Asia. During this time I met many travellers who were travelling for much longer periods, some for several years. Most people like myself had simply worked and saved hard for a year or more then travelled through counties where it is cheap. I also met a couple of people who were working on their travels, a writer ...


60

A return flight from Westray to Papa Westray is a mere £21, or £10.50 per leg. It also happens to be the shortest scheduled flight in the world. Prices haven't changed since at least 2013 and tickets are available on-the-spot. I'm not sure if any other route can beat that price while being just as consistent.


59

I suspect your Mom hasn't spent much time in the places you're planning to visit, because the notion that these countries are dangerous is frankly ridiculous. I've spent most of my life living in Europe, including Ireland, UK, France and Germany and have never been the victim of any personal crime. Maybe I've just been lucky, but if you want something a bit ...


53

Some Stats I ran some stats for you (from our data on Hostelz.com, a travel website that I represent) and currently 97% of hostels provide free bedsheets, and the remaining 3% charge a fee. Towels are a different matter. Currently 50.5% of hostels include free towels, 46.9% charge a fee, and 2.6% don't offer towels at all. The History Over the long ...


52

There is no truly practical discount card for regular flights in Europe that I am aware of. You are looking to fly often and this comes at a price. That being said, there is a number of tweaks where you can optimize. First I suggest you get a very good understanding of which connections are practical in getting you from where you are in the Netherlands to ...


47

The shortest crossings are the quickest and cheapest. So Dover/Calais is very popular. And the EuroTunnel train from Folkstone/Calais is effectively the same, but quicker (35 minutes compared with 90 minutes) and more expensive. However you then have to factor in the drive to and from the crossing points, which costs both time and money. Hence a longer more ...


45

The Walkie-Talkie (20 Fenchurch St) is only the 13th-tallest building in London at 160m height, but it does have a free viewing gallery (height 155m): The famous enlarged glass dome of 20 Fenchurch Street is dedicated to three storeys of exquisitely landscaped public gardens and London’s most exclusive social spaces, including observation decks and an ...


43

I have done a 25 months trip (Around the world but mostly in South East Asia) and a 22 months one (Latin America). I spent about 22,000 Euros each which I saved before or between the trips. Important points: I did not have any regular expenses back home, no health insurance, mortgage, storage fees, family. But I also did not have any income either. I do ...


41

The park is free. You can stand outside the gate and see the meridian, or pay 10 pounds to enter the observatory. It's 9 quid if you book online. More information: https://www.rmg.co.uk/plan-your-visit/tickets-prices


40

I'm not sure where you are coming from, USA? Cities in Europe are like cities in the US, there are business areas, residential areas, entertainment districts with restaurants & theatres. In general you will be safe in Europe but you should probably get a guide book for each country you plan to visit, guides such as Lonely Planet warn of the rough areas ...


38

In Finland/Sweden/Norway/Iceland you are allowed to do this by law as long as you stay away from houses and use common sense like you say. It is literally translated as 'every mans rights' (See also this question on Travel-SE for more information). In the summer these countries are perfect for this kind of holiday and I can recommend it to you very much. In ...


38

The Heron Tower (also known as the Salesforce Tower) is the 3rd tallest building in Greater London with a roof height of 202m, and has a restaurant & bar at 175m / 574ft called Duck and Waffle. Entry to the bar is free, and open to the public.


38

There used to be some tricks in this area if the airline sells significantly cheaper return tickets if the stay included a weekend. Some airlines did this on the assumption that the more price-sensitive leisure travel was more likely to include weekend stays than the less price-sensitive business travel. Suppose you live in city A and need to be in city B ...


37

The UK isn't a very wild place, at least compared with New Zealand, so there isn't a lot of call for 'public huts', by which I'm assuming you mean shelters which are free for anyone to use in remote areas. The only such things I know of are 'bothies' for hikers. You can find out more at the Mountain Bothies Association. They are basic shelters, almost all ...


37

Pay as you normally do at home. Have some cash with you when you land in Greece for small immediate purchases (tourist things, taxi...), I'd say, 200, 300 euros per person. Pay with credit card for larger purchases (hotel, restaurants, train/boat reservations...). ATM are (should be) available pretty much everywhere to get cash. Prefer using Bank ATM over "...


36

That used to be true, back in the 1980s, in the Soviet Bloc countries, because: blue jeans were the fashion trend then and there they were not available on the market, at all (not "sold out", not "in small quantities", not at all.) thus providing an opportunity for home-made imitations and for scarce (rare even) black-market goods Now, that's a textbook ...


35

Let's take this one step at a time. First you must own jeans. Here's your problem - you'll want them to be worth a bit. You can buy jeans for anything from $5 to a few hundred dollars if you really want to in western clothing stores. Let's say an expensive pair - US$200, and I assure you I've never spent that much on a pair of jeans. Now let's assume you ...


35

There are two options, both roughly equidistant and neither an obvious winner: Japan is about 10 hours from Sydney, with direct flights to Tokyo. While snow is rare in Tokyo itself, there is tons of the white stuff anywhere in the Japan Alps (eg. Nagano), on the Japan Sea coast (eg. Kanazawa) and up in Hokkaido, where ski haven Niseko has become a virtual ...


34

France Wild camping is allowed except in specific protected places, depicted here: Anyway there are many local rules, so the best is to find the city hall of the village where you want to camp and ask there. An alternative to city hall is church, where the priest might be able to tell you whether the local church owns some field in the country side. If ...


33

A repositioning cruise is a one-way voyage of a ship between two regions. Most people take cruises where the departure and arrival port is the same. This is simple since only a standard return fare to the port. Those cruises usually do a circuit in short segments, stopping almost every day at a different port. Now since there are different low and high ...


32

You can do that. since one-way tickets are (almost) always more expensive. Booking a flexible return ticket will also be more expensive than the single ticket version, but you should look into it, since it should be cheaper than the double-return tickets in most cases. But you better make sure that you know where and how to buy a ticket in Hong Kong and how ...


32

Walking directions for Google maps says yes, it's possible: https://goo.gl/maps/MVoPY 57 min, 4.6 km from Airport station to the center of Tung Chung. Now I haven't tried this myself, and walking directions remain officially in beta... but a random Street View sampling indicates that the suggested route does have pedestrian walkways of some kind, including ...


32

If you don't mind being outside, you can get some good views over most of London from some of the hills that surround it. Two good spots are Parliament Hill, in Hampstead, and Alexandra Palace, in Muswell Hill.


32

These are known as bothies. A bothy is a basic shelter, usually in a remote location. They are unlocked, and available for anyone to use, free of charge. There are many different styles and sizes of bothies. A lot of them are old cottages, others are purpose-built wooden huts. Guirdil bothy, on the Isle of Rùm. Photo from Geograph, by Calum McRoberts, CC-...


32

It's unfortunate you have pre-ordered Euros. USA banks offer terrible rates of exchange. What you need to do is investigate the foreign currency fees of your various credit and debit cards, almost all of which will work in Greece. Even Discover is accepted (look for Diners Club logo). However the fee will vary from 0 to 3%. Use the cards with the best rate ...


31

Well they travel as cheaply as possible. There are lots of tricks and lots of levels. No matter how cheaply you do it you always meet people in comparison to whom your expenses seem ridiculously extravagant! The main three factors in a trip are 1) accommodation 2) transport 3) food You can save on all these at multiple levels depending on your sense of ...


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