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22

Between Brussels and Bruges, you've basically got one train every 30 minutes for most of the day, taking about an hour. There's no discount for buying these in advance. It's currently €14.80 for a single, double that for a return. However, if you're doing a return over a weekend (out Friday night, Saturday or Sunday, back Saturday or Sunday), there is a ...


13

You can buy tickets beforehand, but there is no real advantage. The price is the same and you can't make reservations. A ticket is valid on any train. On those days you should have plenty of place on the train, so I wouldn't worry about that. In my experience the end of the train (going to Bruges) and front of the train (going to Brussels) is where you have ...


9

It is possible to do both in one day, especially in spring or summer, when the days are a bit longer. But it is not a good idea, or a good option, to use your words. You should keep in mind that the transfer from the centre of Ghent to the centre of Bruges will take one hour (or more), by train or by private car. The main train station in Ghent (Sint Pieters)...


8

Here it is: Blekerstraat, Brugge (link to google map): This is next to Café Vlissinghe, Brugge’s oldest operating café.


8

"De Lijn" is the Flemish public transport company. They serve Flanders, and have very basic services in Brussels (busses from Flanders to the main railway stations in Brussels and vice versa). De lijn offers bus, tram and metro. They do not offer trains! Trains are provided by the NMBS/SNCB. When buying a prepaid card (10 journeys for around 14 euros), it'...


8

You can walk either towns' centre very easily, visit some churches and places in some hours, this is definitely an option. I would personally spend more time in Brugge: give a little more than half a day to Gent then move to Brugge at late afternoon, live the evening, and the day after go in the canals and on the Belfry. I've been to both Ghent and Brugge. ...


7

This really isn't very complex. If only because, once in Charleroi, you could just follow the crowds. And, because of Google. Here is the information from Charleroi's airport website. If you want to do your trip by public transport, you have to get a public bus from the airport to Charleroi train station. You buy bus tickets from a vending machine on the ...


6

According to Eurocanals site, the answer is yes. One possible route is: Brugge - Gent - Antwerpen - Dordrecht - Nijmegen - Düsserdorf. From there you can even join the Danube River and the Black Sea.


5

There is no restriction on the number of passengers on those trains and there is no seat reservation system for those trains. So there is no reason to buy a ticket before the day. As far as I know there are not even lower prices. Regular SNCB train tickets are completely different from 'High speed trains'. The site of the Belgium rail site has a lot of ...


5

Zaventem is the name of the town where the airport is located, which is why it's often called Zaventem airport. Its official name is now Bruxelles-National/Brussel-Nationaal but this is the same airport. “Brussel-Nationaal-Luchthaven” (literally “Brussels-National-Airport”) is the train station designed to serve it. Another potential source of confusion is ...


4

I entered the route in 'de Lijn', the bus search site for the Dutch speaking part of Belgium, which has an English option. The result is an hourly bus to the Brugge area. I used Breskens Veerhaven, the ferry port, as departure stop and used Brugge station as arrival location. If you define your location more precise to where you want to be, you get a more ...


4

This reply might not be useful to OP any more, but might be useful to someone else in the future. Getting public transit information In general, if you are curious about public transport in Belgium, you could just use Google Maps. The bus and tram schedules shown are pretty accurate. Trains are excluded though, so if you plan on travelling a larger ...


4

The popular tourist venues will be open and you can expect market stalls in the central plazas selling refreshments and souvenirs (weather permitting). Expect queues. Restaurants and bars will be open in and around those venues. Cathedrals will be open. National rail will also run. What will NOT be open are banks and any other financial concern that ...


3

Weather in that part of Belgium is always mild but mostly colder than you are used to. It can rain any day of the year but it will not rain every day and most of the time it will not rain all day either. Temperatures range from -10 to +30 C, but in October it is most likely to be in the +5 to +15 range. How warm it will be depends on the actual weather and ...


3

The "Zaventem airport' station is in the airport itself. When you do the search, than the name will be corrected to Brussel-Nationaal Luchthaven or just Brussel-Nat-Luchthaven. The trains in belgium, except for a few special services, like thalys, don't have sit / train reservation. You can get any train. The only detail that you must have in account is ...


3

I stayed in Brussels and then used the train system to visit each city I could one by one, while returning to brussels at night for my place to stay. They have '10 fare cards'...it's basically a ticket that has 10 open slots for you to write in...when you get on the train, fill the one line out and the conductor will stamp it when he takes your ticket. It'...


1

I my mind this is a fairly broad question, as opening hours, and hence closing days, are often not common across tourist attractions. Moreover you have not specified which attractions you are interested in, rendering it even harder to compute a list of opened and closed places. The answer to your question would therefore be: some attractions are opened, ...


1

Maybe this might help someone in the future: I ended up going to Ostend, which is roughly 15 min away from Bruges. That was the last train stop, so instead of leaving in Bruge I just kept going. It's a coastal city as already mentioned. Meanwhile, while there, I discovered there is a Tram from Ostend to Zeebruge which might be an intersting tour. You can ...


1

Brugge is actually a seeaside town in itself, through Zeebruge, it's harbor, which is a full part of the city. Zeebrugge can be easily reached from Brugge by train, but so can Blankenberge, Knokke, Heist and Oostende. Oostende has the most frequent train service. There is a tram linking all the coastal resorts, so you could just go down to one, and return ...


1

In Belgium buying tickets was never a problem, you show up at the station and interact with ticket vending machines until they dispose a ticket for a handful of Euros. We always bought on the spot. As far as my understanding goes, Belgium is so small that intra-country tickets are essentially commuter, without expectation of planning in advance. This is ...


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