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40

Because your wife is an Irish citizen, you are the spouse of an EU citizen. You will therefore continue to have rights under the free movement directive even after most citizens of the UK cease having those rights. In particular, as long as you travel with your wife (or to join her), you are a beneficiary of the directive. So in fact, very little will ...


19

As I understand it. Under the brexit deals that were negotiated by the government but not passed by Parliament there is supposed to be a transition period lasting at least until the end of 2020. Freedom of movement would continue during this transition period. So you would be ok to travel in February on your existing passport. On the other hand, in the ...


16

No, the UK is in the transition period of brexit where nothing has changed in that regard. This is currently due to end on 31st December 2020.


10

Make sure that your wife enters with her EU (Irish) Passport, so that you (as a, visa free, non EU Citizen) are entering and staying as a spouse of an EU Citizen. A long as both of you don't remain in one member state longer than 3 months, there should be no problem when leaving. You will probably have more problems with any coronavirus specific restrictions,...


8

According to the UK government website, nothing much will change for you as a citizen until at least 2021. That means you will not require a passport for traveling to the UK after Brexit if you already have a valid EU Identification Card. What you’ll need to enter the UK If you’re an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen What you’ll need to enter the UK will not change ...


7

Everyone with a residence permit from any Schengen country can travel through any other Schengen country without a visa. must I apply for a visa to do this? No. Will my Austrian "e-card" and residency permit be sufficient to re-enter the other Schengen country from the UK You'll generally need your British passport along with your Austrian ...


5

Assuming your partnership is not registered, you will be able to benefit from the free movement directive only after your partnership is "duly attested," meaning that you have presented evidence of your relationship to the authorities and they have accepted that it is a "durable relationship" for the purpose of the directive. In practice,...


5

The UK Government is maintaining a web page with detailed information on what you need to do after Brexit to travel to Europe. Nothing will change immediately, but after 1 January 2021, the following changes are expected: Your passport may need at least 6 months validity remaining You may need travel insurance as your EHIC card might not be valid If ...


4

Mine was due to run out on March 2020, I went to the post office a week ago and paid £90.40 for the renewal, it arrived yesterday 30th October 2019, the words European Union had gone but it was still in Burgandy not Blue, they’re using old stock until the beginning of the year.


3

Nothing will change during the transition period; as such you'll be able to enter the Schengen Area indefinitely, without your passport being stamped and using the EEA lanes. The nature of the transition period is negotiating future rules; the rules, therefore, remain unchanged in the meantime. Source: https://www.gov.uk/visit-europe-1-january-2021


3

All publicly made statements, from both sides, have made it clear that no change for short stays, in the form of visas, is considered desirable. The Citizens’ Rights and transition portions of the Withdrawal Agreement reflect only the area of long term stays and not short term stays. The Political declaration setting out the framework for the future ...


3

This is a badly formed question because your passport expiry is the same as the Brexit crash-out date! So you are only asking about 2 use cases: a) Britain still in EU, or b) passport is expired. Black-boxing Traveler's link: After a crash-out Brexit, you cannot travel on an expired passport end of inquiry. Anti-DV Disclaimer: I'm referring to a UK ...


3

Now that we are in the brexit transition period, is it the case she can still apply in this capacity? Yes. The withdrawal agreement specifies that EU law still applies in the UK and to the UK until the end of the transition period. This means that citizens of the UK are still treated as EU citizens for the purpose of EU law, including the free movement ...


2

Not decided yet, but likely you'll need a passport, as Home Secretary Priti Patel has vaguely claimed to be against accepting EU ID cards (though Gibraltar ID cards and Irish passport cards should remain OK). Again, though, not decided yet.


2

Yes, Article 10 (Personal scope) of Part II (Citizens' Rights) of the Withdrawal Agreement: (b) United Kingdom nationals who exercised their right to reside in a Member State in accordance with Union law before the end of the transition period and continue to reside there thereafter; also includes the family members. This has been clarified within the ...


2

When it comes to passport control, during the transition period, UK nationals will still be allowed to queue in the areas reserved for EU arrivals only. https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-51194363 Nothing changes until December 31st 2020.


2

The worst-case scenario is ordinary Brits will be able to stay for up to 90 days per 180-day period, upon justifying the purpose and funds for the trip if asked (I can imagine the French will be extremely lax about requiring documentation of British citizens). As a family member of an EU national, however, you'll continue to be free to enter with no ...


1

Any EU country could require UK citizens to have a visa if they visit that country in 2021 or later, and the UK could require EU citizens from any country to have a visa to visit the UK as well. As long as no country starts this nonsense, we can all go visa free. If one country starts requiring a visa, I would be sure that the other country retaliates and ...


1

If you have a EU passport you are anyway still allowed to freely enter the UK. If you are transiting through London on a true connection (ie. both flights on one ticket) at the same airport you do not need to enter the UK. You will make an airside transit in stead.


1

As far as I understand, UK’s data retention policies are compatible with both UK and EU law. The Home Office’s policies and regulations regarding data retention have been devised keeping in mind the EU’s strict privacy laws. An example of that is PNR. Whilst PNR may be retained for up to five years it has to be depersonalized after 6 months. Being an EU ...


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