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84

The answer is almost certainly #1: it's extraordinarily unlikely that existing British passports would be completely invalidated by Brexit. A British passport states that you're a British citizen, which will continue to be the case even if Britain leaves the EU. While I can't point to any official sources, I can note that a) passports of European countries ...


62

While there is a huge level of uncertainty about what will happen after Brexit, or even if Brexit will actually occur, guidance for people visiting the UK after Brexit (thanks @MichaelHampton) would indicate that visa free entry for citizens of an EU country (and Switzerland) is built into British law, and not dependent on EU membership. In other words an ...


40

Because your wife is an Irish citizen, you are the spouse of an EU citizen. You will therefore continue to have rights under the free movement directive even after most citizens of the UK cease having those rights. In particular, as long as you travel with your wife (or to join her), you are a beneficiary of the directive. So in fact, very little will ...


33

The European Commission published its Notice on Travelling Between the EU and the United Kingdom Following Withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the EU in November 2018 and most recently updated it July 2019. It states that: In view of the uncertainties surrounding the ratification of the Withdrawal Agreement, persons who plan to travel (for private or ...


32

Because of your dual citizenship, you are in the position of being able to effectively ignore the border control aspects of Brexit. No matter what happens, you will still have the right to enter both the UK and the EU without restrictions. The only thing that could change this is if Ireland chooses to leave the EU, too. This does not seem likely at this ...


31

Strictly speaking, this is in the hands of the EU, which maintains two lists, Annex I (countries whose nationals requiring a visa for a short stay, labelled A in the link above) and Annex II (countries whose nationals do not require a visa, labelled B). As a member state, the UK is not on either list, and it falls between two stools in terms of automatically ...


31

In your comment, you linked to an official source that (rather understatedly) answers your question: To save the taxpayer money, the newly designed passports will be introduced in a phased approach. After the UK leaves the EU, burgundy passports will continue to be issued but with no reference to the European Union. New blue and gold passports ...


25

Nothing is certain about Brexit. May's deal which would have resulting in a transition period just got voted down in Parliament. This was followed by a confidence vote which the government passed, but it's still far from clear where we go from here. What I think can be said is. The UK is not a country that normally gets in the business of stopping people ...


24

easyJet consists of three companies: easyJet UK, easyJet Europe and easyJet Switzerland. You can tell which company is operating each flight by looking at the flight number: When you book your flight with us, your flight booking is issued by easyJet Airline Company Limited. There are three operating airlines in the easyJet group all of which offer the same ...


23

You will certainly¹ not need a visa. The UK has declared it will not require visas for any EU nationals for short stays, and the EU has declared the same for the UK (see European Commission press release and Brexit preparedness document). However, from 2021 you will most likely need to apply for ETIAS (an electronic authorisation similar to US ESTA). ...


19

As I understand it. Under the brexit deals that were negotiated by the government but not passed by Parliament there is supposed to be a transition period lasting at least until the end of 2020. Freedom of movement would continue during this transition period. So you would be ok to travel in February on your existing passport. On the other hand, in the ...


16

There will be absolutely no change for you. No change in visa requirements. No change in anything. Firstly, post-referendum the UK government need to work out terms of the exit. Based on prior examples, this could take forever! Then, Article 50 gives a timeline at 2 years from notifying the EU of exit terms. The Treaties shall cease to apply to the ...


16

No, the UK is in the transition period of brexit where nothing has changed in that regard. This is currently due to end on 31st December 2020.


14

The UK Government has posted Advice for British passport holders if the UK leaves the EU without a deal After 29 March 2019: You should have at least 6 months left on your passport from your date of arrival. This applies to adult and child passports. If you renewed a passport before it expired, up to 9 extra months may have been added to your new passport’...


11

Yes you can. Per a policy paper, in case of no-deal, EU IDs will be accepted until at least 2021. After that, it depends on what the government deicdes then.


11

The only thing you can know for sure right now is that you currently can't get a Schengen visa. There is no point in applying for one to be on the safe side. Schengen visas are only issued to nationals, who actually require a visa to enter. Visas are not issued to EEA citizens and citizens of visa exempt countries. On the list of visa exempt countries, you ...


10

If you don't need it soon, leave it until it's about to expire. This is because the government have recently changed the rules and no longer add the additional time to the expiry - so if you applied now (October 2018), your new passport will expire in October 2028, not March 2029 as it would have under the old rules. They've done this because the Schengen ...


10

Edited to include link and quote of EC press release on the topic. The problem with visa policies is that they are very often governed by reciprocity: if you don't let my citizens come to your country visa-free, I won't let yours come to mine visa-free (of course this usually does not apply to countries which depend on tourists, for instance). So, even ...


10

Make sure that your wife enters with her EU (Irish) Passport, so that you (as a, visa free, non EU Citizen) are entering and staying as a spouse of an EU Citizen. A long as both of you don't remain in one member state longer than 3 months, there should be no problem when leaving. You will probably have more problems with any coronavirus specific restrictions,...


9

It has been confirmed that, in a no-deal scenario, EU ID cards will remain valid for entry at least until 2021. So just bring your ID card as usual.


9

It’s quite amazing I am having to say this two months from the end of what was meant to be a two year period in which everything was sorted but…..nobody knows. By default, if nothing further happens, then a 'no deal Brexit' is where the country is heading. Though many of the more enthusiastic pro-brexit people like to say that this is all good and fine and ...


9

According to the UK Border Force: You no longer have to fill in a landing card. Your passport (and visa if you have one) will be checked at border control. You’ll usually be asked why you’re coming to the UK. Therefore the question is pretty much moot, as no one will have to fill out landing cards anymore as of 2019, regardless of what happens during the ...


9

My car came with the "EU flag and GB" on the number plates many years ago. When recently, after the Brexit referendum, I needed one replacement plate (the other wasn't damaged) I specifically asked for one with the "EU flag and GB". The garage struggled to locate the correct blank template, but eventually found one for me - apparently they were no longer ...


9

Even after Brexit, you will be an EU citizen because of your Irish citizenship, so you have all the rights that an EU citizen has. When you enter the EU, you should do so using your Irish passport. There are more details in the answers to our reference question about using two passports.


8

According to the UK government website, nothing much will change for you as a citizen until at least 2021. That means you will not require a passport for traveling to the UK after Brexit if you already have a valid EU Identification Card. What you’ll need to enter the UK If you’re an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen What you’ll need to enter the UK will not change ...


7

What's more of an issue is the possibilty of needing some number of months' validity for visits to Europe in the future (unlike now). Many countries require 6 months from date of entry, or something similar. This applies in particular to the EU (gov.uk). This doesn't affect you directly as your passport runs out almost exactly on brexit day. the rule does ...


7

I'm afraid that this falls into the category of "we don't know at the present." If free movement persists under the Immigration (EEA) Regulations 2016 or successor legislation, the landing cards will not be required. But the timing of the repeal of that legislation appears uncertain in the event of a no-deal departure. If there is a deal, the timing will ...


7

The most likely candidate is the Regulation on common rules ensuring basic air connectivity with regard to the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the Union. This sets out the EU's position over air travel in the case of a no deal Brexit, which amounts to freezing the situation at the state in 2018 for at least 7 months, with most provisions holding until ...


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