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13

You should go. I've never been to Montenegro, but I have been to various places in Dalmatia, and I have spent a good deal of time in and around Sarajevo, where my mother in law lives. I'm not sure exactly what you mean by "trekking" (and I have no idea what you mean by "integrist"). Land mines are a problem in Bosnia, but the problem is dwindling, thanks ...


11

I have not "trekked" through the Balkans but I have cycled unaccompanied with no support through Croatia, Bosnia, Montenegro, Albania and Macedonia and found the people very friendly and helpful and the overall experience 'safe'. Although my description of safe may differ from yours. I stayed in a hostel/b&b for one night in Podgorica but the rest of ...


10

Per wikivoyage here's the list of sights: Srebrenica-Potočari Genocide Memorial and Cemetery. For the rest there is nothing much. You can see the place were the Dutch soldiers were stationed. The village itself is not very interesting, but you can actually stop with your family here on a small 2-to-4-day vacation and just enjoy nature and the rich history ...


8

1) You should have no problems crossing from Bosnia and Hercegovina to Montenegro and on into Kosovo. The only proplematic part is the Serbian-Kosovo border. It seems the best way to travel to/from Serbia is to use your EU identity card, rather than your passport because they can not stamp it. 2) There is a direct bus from Sarajevo to Pristina, from ...


8

Depending on where you plan to stay in Bosnia, you'll meet predominantly Christians or Muslims. Easter and Easter Monday are public holidays there so larger cities like Sarajevo or Banja Luka will have shops and monuments closed. Most of the bars, cafes and restaurants will be open and perhaps some smaller shops. But if you decide to you stay at smaller ...


6

In Bosnia (and Herzegovina), the government does something slightly differently, due to the diversity of religion. In addition to certain public holidays (including Easter), each person is permitted two working days per year to fulfill their religious needs. These days are not considered official public holidays, but if taken around other public holidays (...


6

According to Sleeping in Airport, there is one hotel 20 minutes from the airport which can organize airport transfers. This is the Golden Star hotel. Searching the web, also found the Tehnograd hotel that can organize transfers (for a fee).


6

This is exactly the concern I had this past summer (July 2015). There is a bus that goes through that part of Bosnia-Hezergovina, but that involves border crossings that I decided to avoid given that there does not seem to be anything particularly interesting in that area. The choice we made and we're happy with it to simply go around. There is catamaran ...


5

Bosnia & Herzegovina Foreigners who have multiple Schengen visa or European Union member state visa or residence permit of the Schengen Agreement country or European Union member state, if for such passport holders visa is required, can stay up to 15 days in Bosnia and Herzegovina without visa under condition that they enter in BiH from the Schengen ...


5

The crossings in Neum, or to be more specific, Klek border crossing and Zaton Doli border crossing, are normal joint border crossings. It means, that both countries have booths on each crossing, however they are not always occupied, so it may be that there will be only border guard from the country you are about to enter (meaning no exit control). There ...


5

If you have plenty of time, you can take the night bus operated by Croatia Bus, departing 22:00 in Sarajevo and arriving 06:00 in Zagreb. Then the train from Zagreb Glavni Kolod. at 09:57, arriving in Budapest 16:29. The price will be about 55€ (25€ for the bus and 30€ for the train).


4

I can at least partly answer your question by quoting from my Lonely planet: International buses serve much of Europe, including Skopje, Macedonia (€5, 1½ hours), Tirana, Albania (€35, 10 hours), Istanbul, Turkey (€40, 20 hours), and Sarajevo, Bosnia and Hercegovina (€30, 10 hours). And: It's unwise to bring Serbian-plated cars into Kosovo. And ...


4

I'm from Bosnia. I myself never partake in Ramadan and I've never had any serious troubles. As you said yourself, Bosnia has a large non-Muslim presence throughout the whole country. Many Muslims don't fast during Ramadan as well. Some just choose not to, but some can't because of illness, pregnancy, old age or physical work/exercise etc. On top of that, ...


4

According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visa_policy_of_Bosnia_and_Herzegovina EU citizens can enter using a national ID card (incl. Irish passport card) for a stay of up to 90 days within 180 days Also Citizens of the Kingdom of Sweden are exempted from the visa requirement when entering, exiting or travelling through Bosnia and Herzegovina to 90 ...


3

This answer comes super late, but these are my suggestions. Take a bus to Belgrade, then either a bus or a train to Budapest from there (around 20-25 euro). To get you to Belgrade, take a bus from Istočno Sarajevo (around 25-30 euro return ticket). Novi Sad only has a train to Budapest (I think I paid 20 euro for the return ticket). Another, more expensive ...


3

My thoughts on this topic available on personal blog http://www.glowhunters.com/visiting-sarajevo-during-ramadan-and-bayram/ Would be happy if you visit and leave your comment. Blog is in preparation of much more touristic reviews of Balkans and whole Western Europe. But still, Sarajevo has a special role as this is my home town...So be welcomed to sneak ...


3

There are no trains from Sarajevo to Dubrovnik. There are also no convenient train to Split. However, what you can do is take a train down to Ploce. This is a quite agreeable and scenic trip. The train leaves at 6:51, and arrives in Ploce at 10:58. Ploce is a regular stop on all Split - Dubrovnik and vv buses, so you should not have any trouble finding ...


3

Bus: http://www.autobusni-kolodvor.com/en/terminal.aspx?k=173&d=070 (Zenica - Dubrovnik, Sarajevo - Split). Train: Look like there are no trains to Dubrovnik. You can read this topic: http://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowTopic-g294450-i6234-k4733548-Sarajevo_to_Dubrovnik-Sarajevo_Sarajevo_Canton.html


2

The Julian calendar Easter (celebrated by Orthodox Christians, ie. Serbs in Bosnia) is April 15th, so at least in the Serbian parts of Bosnia, it will be "business as usual" the weekend before Easter (when you want to visit).


2

It doesn't appear that you can apply for a visa for Bosnia-Herzegovina in Paris if you're in the country on a short stay. One of the requirements for obtaining a visa from this embassy is: une preuve de légalité de son séjour en France (validité de 90 jours supérieur à la date d’expiration du visa), proof of the legality of your stay in France ...


2

Don't think there are direct bus services from Mostar to Podgorica. There are buses from Mostar to Budva once daily (5.23 hrs) and then from Budva to Podgorica every 20 minutes (1.32 hrs). See this website for more details: http://www.rome2rio.com/s/Mostar/Podgorica This link might be also useful: http://wikitravel.org/en/Mostar


2

I checked the Hungarian railways site and, indeed, this train no longer exists. There is a direct train between Budapest and Sarajevo. It takes around 12 hours. Seen in groundedtravel: Only one direct service operates each day between the two cities. While it is unlikely that this train will sell out in advance of your journey, it can be quite ...


2

First, there are dozens of non-EU countries whose citizens can enter Bosnia without a visa. If you are a citizen of one of those countries, you can enter with or without your Croatian visa: LIST OF COUNTRIES THAT ARE NOT REQUIRED BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA ENTRY VISA Albania, Andorra, Antigua-Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, ...


2

This will be up to the ground handler at the airport of departure. The person needs to call the Bosnian granična policija at the arrival airport immediately and ask them to confirm via email (in Serbo-Croatian if departing from a Yugoslav airport, otherwise in English) that the Bosnian ID is available and that the person is allowed to enter Bosnia, and to ...


2

Here's what happened after following Coke's advice: My wife called her family in Sarajevo, who went to the airport with the ID card. In the meanwhile, we checked in at Lisbon. The ground staff would not check her through to Sarajevo, but offered to check us to Vienna. After we cleared security, we received an e-mail message from the manager of the ...


2

It is quite common, both in Europe and elsewhere, that rental car usage is geographically restricted. This is not directly related to the green card. The green card is issued by the insurance company and tells where the car insurance is valid. What you need is a rental contract, allowing you to use the car where you intend to use it. The insurance for the ...


1

City buses 36, 37, 45 and 47 stop at the airport. Information on their routings is really poor though, but you need to travel in the direction of the left (from your POV when exiting the airport), and ask for the closest tram stop ("tramvajski stajalishte"). From the closest tram stop, catch tram 3, 4 or 6 to wherever you need to be. Alternatively, a ...


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