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43

Yes, seriously, although the US$65 "royalty" is actually included in the US$200 "daily package fee". However, that's the group rate (3 or more people), you get socked another $40/30 per person if you're traveling solo/duo, and another $50/night/person if you're visiting when it's neither midwinter nor monsoon (March-May, Sep-Nov). Bhutan explicitly wants ...


21

I went there solo for 5 days in 2007, as part of a backpacking trip, and it's like this: You contact a tour agent ("operator") and explain that you just want to see the sights for N days. (Many of their tourists hire porters for serious mountaineering.) You will be quoted the minimum rate of $200/day or whatever. If the rate is different or the reply isn't ...


15

India had tried to curb unauthorized trading between these countries by requesting they ban them. However, as of 2013, Nepal and India have agreed to allow 500, 1000 notes again. The Bhutan Monetary Authority also banned it for similar reasons. However, as of January 2015, the RBI has also allowed travelers to take these notes to Bhutan. So yes, that ...


12

Unless you're an Indian, Bangladeshi or Maldivian citizen, you are unable to enter Bhutan without going through a Bhutanese tour agent - either directly or via a tour agent in your own country. You will not receive a visa otherwise. These tour agents are the ones that effectively "ensure" that you will meet the minimum spend as per Bhutanese tourist ...


7

This is indeed true. What HaLaBi's answer misses out on - and this is what makes it expensive rather than difficult per se - is that the Bhutan government sets a minimum daily tariff that tourists are supposed to spend when booking with a travel agent (and visas can only be obtained once a tour package has been booked with a travel agent). The details are ...


6

Obtaining Bhutanese visa for citizens of other than India, Bangladesh and Maldives seems quite difficult. According to the official website of Tourism Council of Bhutan you will need to book a tour with a local licensed tour operator directly or through a foreign travel agent which will submit the visa request for you: Other than Indian, Bangladeshis and ...


5

Despite the country, sometimes allergies are not taken seriously by healthy people, they just can not imagine that the food they all like is something that could cause harm to other people! so, weird questions and reactions towards this kind of allergy are common. I myself can not eat shrimps and some other sea food, and most people like shrimps so they ...


5

The Bhutanese recognize dietary needs very well, as a large portion of the population have specific dietary needs (vegetarianism is largely observed). However I also have oral allergy syndrome and I find that it's not a largely understood form of allergies. Depending on your severity, but most of their food is quite simple (limited in ingredients, heavier on ...


4

From my experience traveling around Bhutan for about a month in the fall of 2010, I fear that this could be a tricky one. But it really depends on your exact travel plans. Given the nature of tourism in Bhutan (highly regulated, with the $200+/day tourism tariff), you will likely be staying in hotels/inns with many other tourists...where buffet breakfasts, ...


4

The flight from Kolkata (in India) to Paro (in Bhutan) is an international flight, as it travels from one country to another country. That an Indian citizen can travel to Bhutan without a visa does not make the flight non-international. If international passengers are refused entry at their destination, the airline is required to return the refused-entry ...


3

I found useful details on this website which is about rafting in Punakha : http://www.raftingbhutan.com/bhutan_raftinginfo.html BEST MONTH FOR RAFTING AND KAYAKING Though Rafting in Bhutan can be enjoyed throughout the year, the best time given the weather condition and water temperature March through May and September through November are the ...


3

So since you have to basically go on a tour (unless you volunteer), it's fairly easy to get a visa - see The Bhutan Visa Myth. Book a tour and they'll sort the visa for you. Another example on onestep4ward.com. Volunteering is certainly possible, and a quick google reveals many who have done it. I'll try and indicate different examples, as each might be ...


3

As Mark Mayo's answer states, these two denominations were "banned" (either officially or unofficially) in the two countries due to issues with counterfeit notes. Other denominations were not banned since most fraud on high value items / purchases would involve these two denominations. While a lot of travel websites and guides state these are still banned, ...


3

There aren't many mediaeval buildings in Bhutan, though there are some old monastries and dzongs (a cross between a castle, town hall and monastry). This is what you should look at if you want old buildings. Most are still in use and have been continuously altered and in some cases rebuilt, though in the same architectural style known as dzong architecture....


1

Road conditions are manageable. You can visit Tawang during November like we have done. But remember that it will be very cold specially near Sella Pass with chances of Snowfall. So just be prepared for that and enjoy your vacation. Cheers.


1

You are already aware of the visa requirements for India. Here the results of a search on IATA's Timatic, the database used by airlines to verify passenger visa and passport requirements (courtesy of Emirates): Transit - Bhutan (BT) Visa Visa required. Visa Exemptions: Nationals of Bangladesh for a maximum stay of 14 days. Transit - ...


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