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15

In short the answer is yes you do need a separate visa for Belarus. Your Russian Student Visa doesn't allow you to enter Belarus. The reason that it has the names of both countries is because the form they use is exactly the same. From the US Embassy in Moscow: Although Russia and Belarus use the same migration card, travelers should be aware that each ...


13

There is no passport control between Russia and Belarus. When entering either country, you'll be given a migration card which is valid for both. Still, there may be arbitrary check by immigration authorities on train (I myself never saw that happen even though BCh train tickets bear no name) or upon arrival by plane (came across that on one occasion), ...


11

No, and you should not generally expect countries to accept visas issued by other countries. Ukraine requires Syrian citizens to obtain a visa, which is, as usual, done at a Ukrainian embassy or consulate. Ukrainian visa requirements are here, there is no provision for entering with a visa issued by Russia or any other foreign country. Belarus likewise ...


10

I did a similar trip last month. The border officials in Brest only put an entry stamp on my Belarus visa. I don't recall them even looking at the Russian visa or asking where I was going after transiting Belarus. (Almost all trains stop in Minsk where you can change, even on a transit visa, so it's not a foregone conclusion that you are travelling ...


10

Let's separate chaff from grain in your considerations at first. You have 3 legs in your trips: Europe - Belarus. You are arriving by air to MSQ, yeah? 5-day visa-free regime perfectly applies to this leg, no matter where you are heading further (to Russia, to Jamaica or somewhere else), except when you do direct transit to Russia, see next point. SPB - ...


8

Basically, it is quite possible that you just cannot go at all. Russia and Belarus have had a Union State for some 20 years, with no border controls between them. All went well for years; third-country nationals filled a common Russo-Belarussian migration card and were admitted at Belarussian border and then proceeded to Russia without any delay or hindrance....


7

Getting connected to the cell network in Belarus is only allowed after presenting identification (a passport). One option for non-residents is to acquire a local SIM-card by MTS carrier called MTS SMART Guest for 12.5 roubles (~7$). You can sign up in the airport by showing your international passport or ID. The customer center is opened from 9AM to 9PM. ...


7

In the end I booked a cheap hotel for a night and never set foot in it. I could have checked in and out five minutes later, as suggested above, but the cheap hotels were all a long way from where I planned to spend the day, so this wasn't an appealing prospect. I figured that even if this was technically illegal and could potentially invalidate my visa, as ...


7

Yes you do. It is only when transiting airports without entering the country that you don't need a visa. With a few exceptions, when entering any country by land, you need at least a transit visa. This is also stated on the GOV.UK website: you need a Belarusian transit visa. Furthermore, one should bear in mind that Belarus and Russia (which share a common ...


7

You do need a visa to enter Belarus by land and visit Brest, and this has always been the case. You can only enter visa-free at Minsk Airport or by land through the Belovezhskaya Pushcha National Park or the Augustów Canal, and you must then remain within these precincts, none of which include Brest.


7

I doubt it - it’s highly likely checkin and/or the gate will have closed by the time you get there


7

The current position appears to be confused. According to the Man in Seat 61 you can cross the border by train as long as you started outside Belarus (which you state you plan to do) but international travellers cannot pick up a train in Belarus and travel to Russia. You do need the right visas too of course. https://www.seat61.com/Russia.htm#London%20to%...


6

Russia and Belarus together form The Union State. There is no passport control between the borders. However, the countries still don't recognise each other's visas, as per http://ria.ru/world/20151001/1294534717.html via http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visa_policy_of_Russia, as such, although you could easily cross the border (similarly to The Schengen Area), ...


6

You need a visa to transit via Belarus, unless you are a citizen of the countries listed below, all of which have visa-free access to the country. Quoting from the website of the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Belarus: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Cuba (for a term not exceeding 30 days), Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Macedonia (provided that there is a private ...


6

After taking the trip, for the future generations coming here from Google: 1) For the flight Europe–MSQ, one goes through immigration in Belarus (as expected) and gets an entry stamp. Single-entry visa is accepted in this case. Visa-free regime cannot be used, as the next destination is Russia. 2) For the flight MSQ–LED, one does not pass Belarus exit ...


6

1) Visa free for Belarus (only when flying into Minsk) is now 30 days. 2) Even though Vilnius is a small airport, going out and back in passport control (you will also need to go through security again) will take too long as arrivals and departures are in separate buildings and levels. TIP: If you are leaving Vilnius airport in a hurry, you can pay to go ...


6

I don't know about Brazil. I discourage your visit to Russia if you are a refugee from Belarus. As there is minimal border control between Russia and Belarus, the USA may believe you have visited Belarus. This may lead to cancellation of your refugee status.


6

The wording of those rules is a little confusing, but most commonly terminology like that would refer to the departure of the first flight on your itinerary. For example, if you have a return ticket with the outward flight on January 10th, and the return flight on January 20th, then any changes made to either flight before January 10th would be considered &...


6

Yes, they mean the same thing. RT doesn't mean real-time but reverse transcription. This refers to the process of converting the viral RNA into DNA that the PCR method can then amplify. Because coronaviruses are RNA viruses, any PCR-based testing for them requires reverse transcription first. All "PCR" tests that anyone talks about now are thus ...


5

The main point of the news you're talking about is that foreigners should use border checkes during traveling between two countries, and that there are no such borders checks while traveling by car or train, because of "union" of the two states, so, even if you have sufficient documents to get back into Russia, there could be no person able to check them at ...


5

No. From GOV.UK: Anyone staying for more than 5 working days in Belarus must register with the local police office (OVIR) in the district in which they are staying. Registration will normally be arranged by your hotel. If you are not staying in a hotel registration must be organised by your host. There are fines for not registering in time. If you ...


5

Much of the ex-USSR is, at least on paper, quite twitchy about using GPS devices; there was a well-publicized case in Russia in 1997 where an American engineer was (briefly) imprisoned for accidentally using one near a military area. That said, that was almost twenty years ago, and GPS in smartphones has become ubiquitous since then. Importing both ...


5

I've put a video on the issue — my trip to Moscow by land and return to Minsk by air (BY passport). Main points: foreigners can only fly into Russia or Belarus and backwards to pass international checkpoints that are unavailable for buses or trains; bus tickets are unavailable to foreigners in Minsk but train tickets are, and though trains aren't checked ...


5

The embassy site is confusing and the relevant info (even in English) is for some reason easier to locate through the Russian-language version. Relevant page in English. Summary: you can visit without a visa or advance application if you fly to the Minsk airport, unless you are flying from Russia. You need medical insurance and a small amount of cash. If ...


5

As of January 1st 2018 you can visit Brest and certain areas around it for 10 days visa free (77 countries). You can also visit areas around Grodno. http://www.belarus.by/en/press-center/press-release/visa-free-travel-time-up-to-ten-days-in-parts-of-brest-oblast-grodno-oblast-as-from-1-january_i_0000071906.html List of visa free countries http://mfa.gov.by/...


5

As it's stated on the website of Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Belarus: According to the Presidential Decree “On establishment of visa-free entry and exit of foreign nationals”, foreign citizens of 80 countries* can enter Belarus for up to 5 days** and exit from the territory of Belarus only through the State border checkpoint of ...


5

Since 2020-07-01 It should be in force as of 2020-07-01: From the Belarusian Telegraph Agency, reported on 2020-06-19: INSK (sic), 19 June (BelTA) - Belarus and Russia have concluded an intergovernmental agreement on mutual recognition of visas and other issues related to the entry of foreign nationals and stateless persons to the territory of the states ...


5

There are a range of approaches to visas. At one extreme, a visa is just permission to travel to a port of entry, where an official will decide whether to admit the traveler. Any operating port of entry has to have people who are authorized to make those decisions, and who can also decide whether to admit visa-free travelers or grant a visa on entry. At ...


5

Don't put your money on it. Nobody can tell you what's really going to happen. Only time will tell. But buying an LH ticket on a route that they declared they won't be flying indefinitely is a gamble. From a quick look at the map, Istanbul looks like a much safer bet. Flying through Russia can also be an option. Some EU to Russia flights were cancelled due ...


5

At present, all EU based carriers are banned from overflying, and landing in, Belarusian airspace. Belarusian airlines are also banned from overflying, and landing in, EU airspace. Thus there are no direct flights from Minsk to anywhere in the EU. Russia has also denied entry to an flight from Paris to Moscow, and another from Vienna to Moscow. These flights ...


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