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132

Tipping is not at all mandatory in Germany and usually the service personnel does not rely on tips as much as in the USA, say. Usually, if you do not state the amount you want to round up to ("make it X EUR" — or "Stimmt so" if you do not expect change at all), they will start picking up coins from their purse and give you the exact amount of change ...


62

TL;DR Tipping is never mandatory, but most Germans do it. 5%-10% is most common, round up to a whole number, or to 50 ct if amount < 10€ Not tipping does not automatically mean that you were unsatisfied, but could be a hint. Should I tip? In general, deciding whether or how much to tip is a subject of debate in Germany as well, just as in many other ...


59

The bicycle riders have to be careful and wait if necessary. Here is a German newspaper article on the subject. The basis for the rule is § 20 of the German traffic regulations (StVO), whose first two paragraphs translate roughly to: (1) Busses, trams, and school busses, which stop at designated stopping points (sign number 224), may only be passed ...


52

I live in Munich and the deposit you pay is intended to cover a breaking or taking of the cup. Especially at a Christmas market it is expected that people will keep the cups or bottles as souvenirs -- that's why the deposit is so high. The more valuable the cup, the higher the price of the deposit. So don't worry about it being "stealing." I have never seen ...


25

Others have explained how tipping works normally in Germany. I'd like to add that what you describe would certainly be a reason for me to not tip at all, i.e. insist on my full change: refusing the correct change is just totally outside acceptable behaviour for a waiter. And by the way, it is less usual but not unheard of to first get the full change and ...


16

German traffic code gives transit passengers special priority, all traffic including bicycles may only pass the vehicle on the right at a walking pace and need to yield to passengers alighting or embarking. (From a detailed explanation this website [in German].)


16

Tipping is generally never mandatory in Germany, but the general etiquette is: Restaurants and bars where they bring you food and drink to the table: Yes Restaurants where you carry your food to the table yourself: No Bars where you carry your drink to the table yourself: Optional, but doing so can improve quality of service if you want another drink later. ...


15

Even if you pay a deposit for the glass, cup or other tableware, you are supposed to return it and get the deposit back. It does not entitle you to steal the cup, even if you forfeit the deposit by doing so. Deposit for tableware is quite common in Germany, not only at the christmas markets. There are however usually several places to buy such cups as well, ...


11

Tap water is Germany's most tested food. It is 100% safe to drink. Water is tested frequently and the results can be read online or in your local newspaper. Having said that, in places where the tap water is from springs it can be very hard indeed. This deposits limescale (calcium carbonate or "Kalk") in household devices if you don't soften it. The ...


10

Being a cyclist as well as a bus user, I always expect the user of the other mode of traffic to not be aware of what is going on at the street. Where the bus stop is right at the bike lane, so the people step out of the bus in front of the cyclists, you have to slow down when there is a bus there and stop before the doors open, as the people will need to ...


10

The behaviour of the waitress described is highly unusual for Germany. Were you at Oktoberfest or some other tourist trap location? Tipping in Germany is not mandatory, though it is very common to round up for an effective tip around 10%. Note that we don't go by percents, we go by convenience. So if your bill is 28.30 Euros, you would typically give 30 and ...


10

I will try to answer the actual question, instead of writing so much about the irrelevant connection to Ingolstadt Village. As already pointed out in the comments, Ingolstadt Village is an outlet retail park and is therefore only served by a connecting shuttle service when the shops are open (not on Sundays and public holidays). That has however nothing to ...


9

Theoretically, this is covered by Pfandrecht, in which the merchant takes the role of the creditor (Pfandgläubiger / Sicherungsnehmer) and you take the role of the debitor (Sicherungsgeber). The deposit (Pfand / Sicherheit) is your property but remains in the merchant's possession as long as you possess[1] the loan (= the cup) under the premise that you will ...


9

Buying a cup of mulled wine, paying a deposit and then not returning can be considered theft in legal terms. (German source): https://www.augsburger-allgemeine.de/wirtschaft/Ist-es-Diebstahl-Gluehweintassen-zu-behalten-id36241727.html At the same time in the article it states and as also stated in the other answers stand owners expect not all of the cups ...


9

How much one tips also depends on the place; more in a restaurant where one sat at a table, less for takeout food, probably nothing in a bakery where one buys bread rolls. It is certainly possible to specify the tip when one hands over the money, as in "make it €15" when the bill says €14.20 (which would be on the stingy side). In the example given above, €...


6

I usually round up to the next Euro when under €10, to the next second or third Euro when under €25-30. After that approx. 10% but not more than €5 except service was extraordinary and outstanding. If the service is below average (or prices are not reasonable), I don't tip since tip is actually already included in the price in Germany and Switzerland.


4

Generally speaking, bicycles are classed as vehicles. And generally, vehicles must yield to pedestrians doing normal pedestrian things that they are entitled to do, like use a bus stop. So the pecking order is Boats > Trains > Pedestrians > Bicycles > Motor Vehicles Drawbridges know large boats are coming, and have plenty of time to signal trains to get ...


4

Edit: As has been pointed out in the comment Ingolstadt Village is not the main stop for Ingolstadt but instead a shopping center - being an English speaker I had assumed incorrectly but should have checked. As far as I am aware nothing written below is incorrect, but some parts are not relevant. You haven't listed the bus number in your question but as far ...


3

10% is the usual amount. But if you have cash, what you usually do is take the amount, and round it up. If your bill is €24.30, you leave €27 which is very close to 10%. If it is €24.90, you will see people thinking: Should I give €27 which is tight or €28 which is more generous? Obviously more or less if the service was very good or very bad. No tip doesn'...


2

I could confirm with the bus company that the bus to airport runs on May 1. From Stadtbus Ingolstadt GmbH, I got an official answer: Unser Fahrplan ist das ganze Jahr über gleich. Egal ob Feiertag, Samstag oder Sonntag. which means that "Our timetable is the same all year round. No matter if holiday, Saturday or Sunday.".


2

Actually, in Bavarian we do not say "stimmt so", but we say "des basst a-so" or "des basst scho" or something alike "mach'ma 18", when rounding up to integer values (please don't ask me to explain the grammar of this assumed "we" form). There's even places, where they refuse the accept the rounded value - but return to the cent, no matter what you tell them (...


2

My experience, also in the North, not just in Munich, is that one can always ask to buy the glass/cup/mug. I have never been refused and am generally given a clean one, often wrapped to prevent breakage. I have even asked on behalf of a non-German speaking friend who wanted one of each type and the stall holders happy to help. I imagine that the cost of the ...


1

I rode bicycles for 10 years earlier in my life as my primary mode of transportation a long while ago, and pedestrians always have the right of way over any other conveyance. And, the purpose is that... any other kind of conveyance could cause more damage. A bike rider, a skate boarder, a car, a motorcycle.. all of those things are potentially moving faster ...


1

The waitress was being substantially rude to you and I don’t understand your company advising you to let it be (were they non-German?). The correct answer to her would have been ‘x cents are missing’ (in German: ‘Da fehlen x cent.’) with a mildly angry tone in your voice. While tipping is common in restaurants in Germany it is not mandatory and it is always ...


1

In Germany, not leaving any tip is telling you weren't satisfied with the service. You may do this, but it's very rude if you also tell in words you were satisfied. The most common practice is to tip around 5%. Small orders 10%.


1

I think tipping for normal paid work is a bad habit to support and is not expected or traditional in Germany. I never leave tips other than (generously) rounding off. And none to housekeepers etc


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