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132

Tipping is not at all mandatory in Germany and usually the service personnel does not rely on tips as much as in the USA, say. Usually, if you do not state the amount you want to round up to ("make it X EUR" — or "Stimmt so" if you do not expect change at all), they will start picking up coins from their purse and give you the exact amount of change ...


62

TL;DR Tipping is never mandatory, but most Germans do it. 5%-10% is most common, round up to a whole number, or to 50 ct if amount < 10€ Not tipping does not automatically mean that you were unsatisfied, but could be a hint. Should I tip? In general, deciding whether or how much to tip is a subject of debate in Germany as well, just as in many other ...


59

The bicycle riders have to be careful and wait if necessary. Here is a German newspaper article on the subject. The basis for the rule is § 20 of the German traffic regulations (StVO), whose first two paragraphs translate roughly to: (1) Busses, trams, and school busses, which stop at designated stopping points (sign number 224), may only be passed ...


52

I live in Munich and the deposit you pay is intended to cover a breaking or taking of the cup. Especially at a Christmas market it is expected that people will keep the cups or bottles as souvenirs -- that's why the deposit is so high. The more valuable the cup, the higher the price of the deposit. So don't worry about it being "stealing." I have never seen ...


47

The best source I can find is this picture gallery of the local newspaper (Süddeutsche Zeitung, in German). My advice is based on that, own experience and other sources where mentioned: You can bring your own food. (Within some limits, see below. Unless it is a "Wirtsgarten".) In case you bring food, you might want to think of napkins, cutlery, tablecloth, ...


43

It can be had but the new trend of heavily-marketed international ciders hasn't arrived to Germany. High-quality craft ciders from Britain, France or elsewhere would also be hard to find. Consequently, cider is a rather low-key old-fashioned drink and not very prominent. Instead of a well-known brand or the word “cider”, you should look for drinks called “...


35

There is no meaning in the ‘dress code’ of your picture — simply because there is no dress code involved. Your wife attempted to look like the locals — wearing a Dirndl — but failed absolutely miserably at it. Traditional Dirndl are ankle-long, come with an apron and don’t show the underdress. The underdress (clearly visible in your picture) is essentially ...


30

Well...it has no meaning as "dress code", it simply looks wrong. Here a picture of actual "diandlgwand" (girl clothes) with different cuts of colors: and here the short form: All clothes have one-piece (!) skirts which at least reaches the knee, very often combined with a apron. Your wife skirt is too short and it is not one piece: it shows a second skirt ...


29

I guess you have been looking in the wrong places, and possibly for the wrong words on the label. There is Apfelwein which is commonly translated as cider.


25

Others have explained how tipping works normally in Germany. I'd like to add that what you describe would certainly be a reason for me to not tip at all, i.e. insist on my full change: refusing the correct change is just totally outside acceptable behaviour for a waiter. And by the way, it is less usual but not unheard of to first get the full change and ...


16

Tipping is generally never mandatory in Germany, but the general etiquette is: Restaurants and bars where they bring you food and drink to the table: Yes Restaurants where you carry your food to the table yourself: No Bars where you carry your drink to the table yourself: Optional, but doing so can improve quality of service if you want another drink later. ...


16

German traffic code gives transit passengers special priority, all traffic including bicycles may only pass the vehicle on the right at a walking pace and need to yield to passengers alighting or embarking. (From a detailed explanation this website [in German].)


15

The tourism office has a website "München accessible for all!" with lots of information. For assistance at the airport: Information about „barrier-free traveling at Munich's Airport“ as well as the brochure „Barrierefrei“ can be found here: www.munich-airport.de/ .. /barriere.. or phone +49 (0) 89 / 9 75 00 and Flughafen München GmbH, Postfach 231755, ...


15

Even if you pay a deposit for the glass, cup or other tableware, you are supposed to return it and get the deposit back. It does not entitle you to steal the cup, even if you forfeit the deposit by doing so. Deposit for tableware is quite common in Germany, not only at the christmas markets. There are however usually several places to buy such cups as well, ...


14

In most of Bavaria, beer is the prevalent local (alcoholic) drink (with the exception of some regions in Franconia, which are wine-centric). Cider is generally not a typical drink in Bavaria (there might be exceptions closeby to Frankfurt and/or Lake Constance). So if you are looking for Cider in Bavaria, the best bet would be to go to an Irish/British/... ...


13

I'm not sure I completely understand the question, but if it is "Why has this dress been met with surprise at the Oktoberfest in Munich, I see two points: Comparing to pictures of random dirndls the white underskirt strikes me as very long and visible, it is typically not or barely visible/there. Also the typical apron is missing. See Wikipedia on ...


13

In Germany, service costs are always (§ 107, 3.) included in the compensation. But it’s common to give a tip if you are happy with the service (but you are never required to). If you are unhappy with the service, you should give no tip at all (instead of a very low tip). I found the following recommendations (sources are in German): knigge.de, Der ...


13

Beside another picture on Panoramio, I only found this paragraph in german on the Bamberg site, which refers to a Steinobelisk near the castle: Neben dem unweit der Burg befindliche Grab von A. F. Marcus lässt sich auch ein Steinobelisk aus dem Jahr 1903 finden, der eine besondere Botschaft vermittelt. In östlicher Richtung gelegen, befindet er sich ...


12

Currently, there is unfortunately a lot of scaffolding going on in Neuschwanstein. I quote the official homepage: Restoration works at the western and northern façade Because of restoration works the western and northern façade of Neuschwanstein Castle will be scaffolded until the end of 2012. We apologize for any inconveniences. The ...


11

Tap water is Germany's most tested food. It is 100% safe to drink. Water is tested frequently and the results can be read online or in your local newspaper. Having said that, in places where the tap water is from springs it can be very hard indeed. This deposits limescale (calcium carbonate or "Kalk") in household devices if you don't soften it. The ...


10

We had a look at public transport versus a tour for our visit and came to the conclusion that while it may cost somewhat more, the convenience of a tour from Munich outweighed the money saved. Grey Line was the company that we did it with, because they were the only one running when we were in Munich (February). They were perfectly adequate if you're not ...


10

The behaviour of the waitress described is highly unusual for Germany. Were you at Oktoberfest or some other tourist trap location? Tipping in Germany is not mandatory, though it is very common to round up for an effective tip around 10%. Note that we don't go by percents, we go by convenience. So if your bill is 28.30 Euros, you would typically give 30 and ...


10

I will try to answer the actual question, instead of writing so much about the irrelevant connection to Ingolstadt Village. As already pointed out in the comments, Ingolstadt Village is an outlet retail park and is therefore only served by a connecting shuttle service when the shops are open (not on Sundays and public holidays). That has however nothing to ...


10

Being a cyclist as well as a bus user, I always expect the user of the other mode of traffic to not be aware of what is going on at the street. Where the bus stop is right at the bike lane, so the people step out of the bus in front of the cyclists, you have to slow down when there is a bus there and stop before the doors open, as the people will need to ...


9

How much one tips also depends on the place; more in a restaurant where one sat at a table, less for takeout food, probably nothing in a bakery where one buys bread rolls. It is certainly possible to specify the tip when one hands over the money, as in "make it €15" when the bill says €14.20 (which would be on the stingy side). In the example given above, €...


9

Buying a cup of mulled wine, paying a deposit and then not returning can be considered theft in legal terms. (German source): https://www.augsburger-allgemeine.de/wirtschaft/Ist-es-Diebstahl-Gluehweintassen-zu-behalten-id36241727.html At the same time in the article it states and as also stated in the other answers stand owners expect not all of the cups ...


9

Theoretically, this is covered by Pfandrecht, in which the merchant takes the role of the creditor (Pfandgläubiger / Sicherungsnehmer) and you take the role of the debitor (Sicherungsgeber). The deposit (Pfand / Sicherheit) is your property but remains in the merchant's possession as long as you possess[1] the loan (= the cup) under the premise that you will ...


9

There are lockers at the train station in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, as mentioned here: https://www.bahnhof.de/bahnhof-en/Garmisch-Partenkirchen-3805998 There are no prices on that page, but usually a small locker (hand luggage size) costs 3 - 4 Euros per day, and a big locker for a checked-in luggage size is around 5 - 6 Euros per day. However, as soon as you ...


8

The western half of what you're looking at would fall well within the range usually referred to as Allgäu - here is a 'map' of the outlines of that region as used in today's tourism industry, covering both Germany and Austria although originally Allgäu was a part of the German Oberschwaben, see here. The Austrian areas are part of (Nord)Tirol - a map with ...


8

Answering from a non-Bavarian point of view, your wife more closely resembled a Funkenmariechen than someone wearing a Dirndl. The former is the name for female dancers in a specific costume of a different German tradition from a completely different region of Germany. Just google for pictures of Funkenmariechen. They are typically bright blue or sometimes ...


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