34

Their website, which you link to, has this FAQ Can you take portable chargers on planes? Most airlines allow lithium batteries that do not exceed 100W/hours in the carry-on luggage. You can find the product specific information on the outside of the power bank. Also, consult your airlines for specific information about your flight and travel locations as ...


33

There are limits that were introduced by the US Federal Aviation Administration. Those have been used as well by numerous other airlines, for example Cathay Pacific. They generally impose a limit on capacity per passenger and on top of this disallow checking them in, so you must take them into your hand luggage. If a website lists grams of Lithium, use this ...


31

I've had two battery packs / power banks, and travelled to several countries with several airlines, taking them as carry on, without any problem...until... Last year, I flew from Tokyo Haneda, via Beijing, China to Vancouver, Canada. In Beijing, Chinese officials sent me to a security point, where several people including myself had our power banks taken ...


17

As I understand it, lithium batteries are not permitted to be carried aboard if there is any possibility of the contacts being shorted out in transit (this can lead to excessive current draw, heat, and possibly fire or even explosion). If the battery is inside your laptop, it is considered protected against accidental short. If a battery is carried outside ...


17

From the IATA guidelines, all lithium batteries are subject to regulation, with specific rules depending on the type of device (portable electronic-device, medical device or spare battery). A power banks is considered a spare battery (not a portable electronic device) and are restricted to carry-on luggage only (i.e. prohibited in checked luggage) and ...


13

No, they don't. Security looks for weapons and bombs; if it's not either, they're not interested. Of course, there's always the off chance that you'll run into some particularly zealous and clued-in inspector with a fetish for lithium batteries, but realistically I wouldn't worry about it. Also, 90% of the regulation you link to is about transporting ...


13

It looks like all your devices can be charged via USB. In this case you should already have voltage switching chargers for all of them. In fact, these chargers are interchangeable, except for the cable part to connect the iPhone. Should this be the case all you need is a plug adapter such as this one. You buy several and they are sold in packs sometimes. To ...


11

Avios isn't an airline. Presumably you are flying with British Airways or Iberia, which are owned by the same parent company. From BA's list of banned and restricted items: Please always ensure that you: [...] Don't take any damaged batteries or equipment with you. By using a damaged lithium ion battery you are endangering yourself, and by taking it on an ...


9

With 19V it would be ... what? To get Watt hours you need a voltage yes but (almost always) the ampere-hour figure needs to be paired with the cell voltage to get the watt-hour figure. It's extremely likely to be a lithium-ion cell which is 3.7V so that'll be a 20 * 3.7 * VAh = 74 Wh battery. This is very crude because the voltage drops as the battery ...


8

Lithium batteries are a safety hazard as a thermal runaway can and has lead to fires. They are permitted in carry-on because if a fire starts, it can be fought and extinguished, as in this incident near Sydney. the Australian Transport Safety Bureau remarked in their investigation: In the meantime, the ATSB stressed, "this event reinforces the importance ...


8

Due to safety concerns, IATA issues guidelines concerning the transport of lithium batteries, which airlines will likely enforce. (In a worst case scenario, a lithium battery could spontaneously explode and cause a fire in the cargo hold, which is inaccessible to humans during the flight.) The Lithium Battery Guidance Document for 2015 states (emphasis ...


8

There have been rules re carrying batteries for many years. They may be found in (at least) IATA documentation and also a number of courier companies and most battery manufacturers have advice documents. Removable batteries must be carried in carry-on luggage with the exception mentioned below. Having batteries in carry=on makes sense - would you rather ...


7

In practice, you're unlikely to have issues at most places as people are unlikely to inspect the wattage of each power brick. However, some airports inspect each and every one, and if the power isn't visible or is worn off, they will just assume it's over the limits and take it away (see my experience in China). Note that in this case it had nothing to do ...


6

Assuming that your 10500 mA∙hr battery pack operates at 3.7 V, the energy capacity would be 3.8 V × 10500 mA∙hr ≈ 40 W∙hr. (Lithium-ion cells typically operate between 3.2 V and 3.8 V.) By IATA guidelines, that would be well under the 100 W∙hr limit for lithium ion batteries. The IATA guidelines list additional conditions to be met as well. (They must be ...


5

The IATA guidelines for Lithium batteries for passenger luggage are summarised here. CR2032 batteries are Lithium-methal batteries containing less than 2 g of lithium each (about 0.1 g, actually). As such, you are allowed to transport in your carry-on luggage: up to 15 devices with such a battery up to 20 spare batteries Devices with a such a battery (but ...


5

Just as a note for future travels, as far as I remember beside of the problem with the battery in the luggage you might face a second problem: Electronic devices in your carry on must be able to be turned on for inspection. They will not ask for this every time, but it can happen, and happened to me already several times. You will have a hard time turning ...


5

There is one additional reason your approach may not only lead to your battery being confiscated, but now your laptop being confiscated. As specified in this article, all electronic devices carried in carry-on luggage must be fully charged and functional. If it does not turn on, it may be confiscated prior to boarding. There are now concerns that ...


5

The "Aukey" power bank PB-Y3 does not appear to have a Wh rating marked on the outside of the case, based on studying a Russian review video. The typical airline 100Wh limit could be considered to be exceeded then, by the airport security personnel since 3.7V * 30,000 = 111Wh. I have seen them take power banks away from people (in Asia- US security seems ...


5

It gets tricky to use electronic equipment already at much higher temperatures than the -50°C you are targetting in your question. Be aware that the problem is not only limited to the batteries, but to many other electronic and mechanical parts. Going down to -50°, you will risk both temporary malfunctioning and perhaps even permanent damage to your ...


4

As you are travelling on Lufthansa, Google's answer for "lufthansa battery policy" points to: http://www.lufthansa.com/mediapool/pdf/74/media_1070298774.pdf Which states: Portable electronic devices with lithium Description: portable electronic devices containing lithium-metal or lithium-ion cells or batteries, e.g. watches, calculators, cameras, ...


4

From the Lufthansa, Dangerous Goods that may be carried under certain Conditions regulations (yours should be less than 10 Wh each): Portable electronic devices containing lithium metal or lithium-ion cells or batteries, such as watches, calculating machines, cameras, cellular phones, laptop computers, camcorders, etc., when carried for personal use. ...


4

In China, they are super strict about batteries and yes they read. I haven't seen that much in the US, they seem to not be as strict.


4

The regulations on Air India's website are very clear. The relevant parts are : "for lithium ion batteries the Watt-hour rating must not exceed 100 Wh" "Batteries spare / loose, including lithium ion cells or batteries, for portable electronic devices must be carried in carry-on baggage only" and "Articles which have the primary ...


3

YES, for a US airline, but you must bring them as Carry On baggage. You should not check them. Many other airlines follow this guidance as well. FAA: Pack Safe Lithium ion and lithium metal batteries, spare (uninstalled) Most airlines publish the guidelines on their web site so you can easily search for you specific case. Example Lufthansa: Carry-on ...


3

The regulations for lithium batteries on flights are made by IATA and they have an information page. Although we generally discourage link-only answers, I'm not going to attempt to summarize here, since your question requires a high level of technical detail that probably isn't appropriate to this site. If you're trying to get your product certified, you ...


3

Mine with 20000 maH was taken by the officer in charge at Krabi's Airport. According to them it is too big and they can't allowed me to carry it.


3

Lufthansa considers powerbanks to be spare lithium batteries and thus they may be carried in your carry-on and only in your carry-on.


3

For small batteries (cameras, phones...) , keep them in pockets inside your coat, close to your body. For bigger batteries, you could use an ice-chest with some hand warmer pads to keep the batteries warm. There are some suggestions here.


2

From personal experience, yes. I once received a replacement battery as I was leaving on a trip. I replaced the battery, but the old one was stuck with me for the remainder of the trip. It was just in my backpack, in a box, and it passed though without comment on the way there, and on the way back.


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