New answers tagged

1

When you are asked "have you ever been refused a visa", you say yes and explain what happened back then. You just didn't meet the requirements nine or ten years ago, but that shouldn't cause any problems as long as your situation has changed and you meet the requirements today. If you had been refused a visa two weeks ago, that might be a problem. If you ...


18

Your passport has the correct date. Take it along to the nearest CBP Deferred Inspection site where they can correct the error. The CBP I-94 web site FAQ says this: If there is an error or mistake on the paper or electronic form I-94, the traveler can contact the Deferred Inspection office closest to their location. A list of Deferred Inspection ...


1

As per the comment from the OP, the system will notify you that your old one wasn't saved, so it's safe to make a new application through the system, saving as you proceed this time.


3

You didn't qualify for the visa because the consular officer decided that you did not overcome the required presumption under U.S. law that every visitor visa applicant is an intending immigrant until they demonstrate otherwise. Applicants for visitor visas must overcome this presumption by demonstrating: • That the purpose of their trip is to enter the ...


10

If the next trip is for a similar duration (or fits within the period you were originally admitted for), there is no reason you would need to stay away for any particular period of time. What's not allowed in tourist status is to try to live in the US, but two short visits do not add up to that no matter how close they are to each other. You'd be allowed ...


2

Telling the truth is the way to get more probabilities to get the visa. I interpret this in a wide sense, so also not hiding important informations. Why are you travelling in USA? In specific locations? Alone? Officers checks such facts and get an idea of what you will do, and the risk. There is no wrong way to answer them, but you officers should be ...


6

As far as I'm aware there is no rule that allows non-Mexico citizens from entering the border zone without an I-94 permit. Mexico citizens can cross into the border zone with just a Border Crossing Card (BCC) with no passport and no I-94, as long as they are to remain in the border zone and then crossing back into Mexico. The border zone is approx 25 ...


9

Contrary to the Schengen 90/180 rule, there is no hard rule for this, but: you should not be attempting to live in the US under the VWP or using a B-1/B-2 visa. This means that consecutive stays close to the 90-day limit will clearly not be seen with a good eye there will be a big question about how you support yourself for so long while you are in the US ...


2

There is none. However, the more recent time in the US you have, the more likely you are to receive additional scrutiny and possibly be denied entry. The likelihood also depends on the purpose and planned duration of your second visit. I'm looking for an official source and will add it when I find it.


2

The required presumption under U.S. law is that every visitor visa applicant is an intending immigrant until they demonstrate otherwise. Therefore, the documents you present must overcome this presumption by demonstrating: That the purpose of your trip is to enter the United States temporarily for business or pleasure; That you plan to remain for a specific,...


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