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31

This has happened to me multiple times with local cards as well so I doubt they target foreign cards. Every time the police have helped me rather swiftly, provided me with a copy of the case registered which I took to the bank who then changed the money for me without delay at all. But yes dealing with Chinese police can be frustrating and take a long ...


29

Alternatively to an ATM, you can ask for cashback in stores. The way this works is that after scanning your items, you can ask the person at the till for cashback of X amount (normally smaller amounts work better as they might not have enough in the tills/the app of your choice might have a cap), they then add that to the purchase amount, charge the ...


28

First of all, it depends on why your card is retained. I can think of at least three common situations: You have entered a wrong PIN too many times. Your issuing bank has decided to cancel and retain your card, e.g. because you have exceeded your credit limit and they want to prevent you from charging the card at "offline merchants". This may of course be a ...


20

ATM withdrawals will be capped, so you will only be able to withdraw around INR 2500 ($36 US) a day from an ATM. (This limit might change - as Andrew says, the situation is fluid). Additionally, each withdrawal using a foreign card can have around a $7 fee. Depending on your timing and the area, ATMs might have a queue, on average around 20 people. ...


17

Bank of America is part of the so called Global ATM alliance. According to Bank of America's FAQ (see "Using your ATM card or debit card at an international ATM" and then "What is the Global ATM Alliance?): Use your Bank of America ATM or debit card within the Global ATM Alliance to avoid the non-Bank of America usage fee for each withdrawal, transfer or ...


16

My recent experiences trying out different ATMS (around Rancagua) are the following: Banco BICE: 2500clp (though these seem to be few and far between) Scotiabank: 3500clp Banco Estado: 4000clp (they didn't charge anything extra a few months ago, but now I've tried several and they all want 4000) :-( BBVA: 4100clp BCI: 4738clp CorpBanca / Itaú: 3000 5000clp ...


14

Got it. Yes, there are, and there's even a handy website: Link's ATM locator which, when you click one on the map, will tell you if it supports 5 quid notes or not. Checking the one I remember, it shows that indeed, the BT phone/ATM kiosk opposite Waterloo station entrance (address: Waterloo road, London, SE1 7LY) still dispenses 5 quid notes. :D I'm ...


13

This is the temporary shack on the Cambodian side. You can see the elaborate roof of the bigger newer building hiding behind the welcome sign. This was January 2015. The new building may be open by now. The Lao side at the time looked more substantial. I don't recall an ATM or a bank. Maybe but I kinda don't think there was. I would get US dollars before ...


13

There are a few banks that allow you to withdraw from their own ATMs without a card (usually as an "emergency withdrawal service", with a code you get via telephone banking), but other than that, as far as I am aware, you most definitely need a physical card to withdraw from an ATM. You may want to check out Transferwise. They can provide a real Mastercard ...


12

I'll post as an answer but this is more of an update to @hippietrail answer. I actually crossed the border today (Laos -> Cambodia). The tenporary shack is still there, still in use. No sign of an atm directly at the border (on either side of it). In Stung Treng (Cambodian side, kilometres away) there are some atms (with US dollars). At the bus station of ...


10

These machines have been designed to perform Every Task® bank users need to perform in a bank terminal. Top slot : card bank note. Middle slot: Credit or Debit card bottom middle slot: tickets, receipts. Left bottom slot: Outcoming Cash Right bottom slot: incoming cash in a sealed or unsealed packign ( depends on the version). central keyboard: ...


10

A few rules of thumb: Whether paying directly at a merchant or withdrawing cash, refuse any conversion (DCC or dynamic currency conversion), always go for the local currency. Your bank/card issuer will charge you for the conversion but it's almost always cheaper. In some countries, local ATM will slap a fee on top of the amount to be withdrawn no matter ...


10

Here is a brief instruction on how to use an ATM: When you find an ATM, first check if it accepts your card. Usually, the ATM shows which card it can accept (e.g. Visa, Plus, MasterCard, etc...) on the edge of the machine. If the ATM accepts your card, insert your card and start the transaction. After the ATM recognizes your card, the screen switches to a ...


9

I'm currently in Chile and have withdrawn money on several occasions. So far, once I've aborted my withdrawal because the machine told me it was going to charge for my withdrawal. This, while, later, an ATM from the same bank did not charge. I've tried with 3 or 4 different banks. This suggests to me that ATM withdrawal fees depend not on the bank, but on ...


9

You really don't need to use lots of cash. Most locals deals in credit cards for everything, they are a lot safer. Sometimes even hotdog carts accepts credit cards, Taxi/Uber will gladily accept credit cards. Just keep R$ 300,00 in your pocket/day in case there are too many tourists queuing in an ATM or for small expenses like bus tickets or popcorn. ATM ...


9

I had gone to Prague in the month of August 2016. I withdrew around 2200 CZK which was around 80 Euros. When I checked my Deutche Bank statement, I saw I was charged around 83 in total. So around 3 Euros extra. I was on a transit at Prague on my way to Krakow last month. My friends and I withdrew 1000 CZK which was around 36 Euros, and our DB statement ...


9

In the EU, the Payment Services Directive 2, article 3(o), which went into force in January 2018, requires that ATMs inform you of every fee and charge added by the ATM operator before you make the withdrawal. As Aganju says, free-standing ATMs are generally more likely to charge additional fees than ATMs at bank branches. Usually the withdrawn amount will ...


8

Bank Rakyat Indonesia (BRI) and Bank Negara Indonesia (BNI) are separate banks. BRI is bigger and has a more widespread ATM network, with over 20,000 compared to BNI's 6,000. There's conflicting information about fees, with at least one claim that BRI has lower fees but a similar forum post stating there are no fees for most Indonesian ATMs.


8

Uber works very well in India and you can use the card you already have connected to the app, but it will charge in rupees. I recommend using Uber, most of the time its actually cheaper than what Autos will charge a foreigner, and I have been ripped off by Ola drivers. Just make sure that your phone will work in India (T-mobile is great FYI). I would also ...


8

Yes, you will have a lot of trouble. For starters, there's an officially imposed cap of about INR 2000 on ATM Withdrawals per day. Now, given the fact that INR 2000 is barely USD 30, you can easily imagine that amount won't get you too far in a day. Especially as a foreign tourist. Now, add to this the fact that anecdotally, about 9 out of every 10 ATM ...


7

If the ATM is in a bank agency and it's working hours you can go inside and ask them to give you the card back. It's not 100% guaranteed that they will give it back. Each bank has its own policies. Most likely they will identify you (you probably have to give them an ID or Passport), they will make a copy of the ID/Passport and they will return the card. ...


7

One thing you should be aware of is not all cases of an ATM eating your card are merely accidental equipment failure. There is actually a variety of ATM skimmer that prevents the ATM from properly ejecting your card, allowing the thief to come along after you have left, and steal your card: http://krebsonsecurity.com/2012/11/beware-card-and-cash-trapping-at-...


7

From both personal experience and Internet forums, there are multiple ATMs at Ben Gurion airport in Tel-Aviv. I've even managed to find a photo of one ATM in the arrivals zone:


7

Although BRI seems to have a bigger network than BNI, there seems to be an advantage in using BNI cash machines: they usually (if not always) accept cards belonging to a larger number of card networks. BNI cash points accept: Visa, Visa electron, MasterCard, Cirrus, Maestro, Plus, ATM Bersama, Prima, BNI, Link. BRI cash points usually do not accept cards ...


7

The situation is fluid. I was there two weeks ago. On arrival I used the ATM at the upscale hotel (no line), but by the end of my stay it was empty. The site I was working at had its own ATM, with a block-long line, and it always ran out before everyone got there. The only ATMs I would expect to be stocked are airside, and I am not sure there are any such. ...


7

There are long lines and a lot of ATMs are closed. Also, there is currently a limit of 2000 per card per ATM per day. However, the other day my friend with a German card was able to make eight withdrawals at one ATM in five minutes with a single card and thus get 16.000. As for why that was possible, I can only speculate that the limit system didn't work for ...


7

Yes, as far as I'm aware you can use a MasterCard to withdraw money at some ATMs in every Asian country except North Korea and Iran. Beware that in some countries, notably Japan, South Korea and Myanmar, not all ATMs will accept foreign cards. In most, though, virtually every ATM will sport the familiar MC logo.


7

As zeocrash stated, Maestro is accepted pretty much all over the place. In fact, my (Swiss) bank card uses the Maestro system if not used at an ATM of the issuing bank. The terminals I have seen recently are all alike, and their primary contact with the card is the chip. Most also allow for no-pin transactions up to CHF 40. You might check the general ...


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