54

There are seven countries which have territorial claims on parts of Antarctica: Britain, France, Australia, New Zealand, and Norway, which all recognize each other's claims; and Chile and Argentina, whose claims are disputed. In practice, however, all claims are suspended under international treaty, and there are no checkpoints or immigration officers. For ...


44

There are very few mentions of railways in Antarctica. According to this webpage by Glyn Williams, a train enthusiast, there used to be one railway in the French Dumont d'Urville station, used on a very short distance to transport supplies. On the same page and on some others, there are mentions of multiple places in the far South with former railways. For ...


37

Companies such as Antarctica Logistics provide transport to and from the continent. Prices in general appear quite high. I would suggest doing multiple long ski tours before attempting this, for somewhat obvious reasons...


19

From 101Visa: No single government controls Antarctica, so visitors do not need visas to go there. But with the ratification of the Antarctic Treaty’s Protocol on Environmental Protection in 1998, all visitors who are citizens of countries that are signatories of the Antarctic Treaty must have a permit to visit Antarctica. Cruise ship passengers are ...


16

Couldn't be easier. You just hire a plane (I mean "a private plane charter") to fly you there, and another one to fly you back from the other side. Any jet charter in NZ will do it, and any number of companies do it enough they actually have Google-Ad-Words web sites for the function. Simply google "private jet charter, NZ to Antartica". ...


14

Official response from Amanda Lynnes, Communications & Operations Assistant of the IAATO — International Association of Antarctica Tour Operators: Dear Maxim, Thank you very much indeed for contacting IAATO. No need to apologise for your English - it is very good! Because Moldova is not an Antarctic Treaty Party, you are a citizen of ...


7

I flew from SYD to SCL at the start of last year (Jan 2013) specifically to go on a 20-day Antarctica cruise. We got as far south as just shy of 65 degrees on the cruise. On the flight back (Qantas QF28) from SCL to SYD we got so far south that I was able to take some photos of tabular icebergs from the aircraft. Around the same time I managed to grab one ...


5

Certainly. Qantas flies them from Australia. Antarctica Flights They're infrequent, but a few a year do fly down. I watched a documentary on it, it's crazy that you can pay less for an 'inner' seat where you don't even get to see out the window without craning your neck! From the site: The flight provides a full day of Antarctic experience. Our flight ...


5

I am not sure I understand whether your grandfather is supposed to get a permit, on what basis and what the practical consequences could be but he can in any case get a permit from the country of departure/last port of call before reaching Antarctica. So being a Moldovan citizen on a Moldovan vessel does not prevent you from applying for a permit. I reckon ...


4

Exact times will vary by location and weather, but for most stations, the first flights in might be in mid- to late-October, and the last flights out in perhaps late March. Note that not all summer staff will travel down right at the start of the season - a lot of them will still be arriving into December. Somewhere deep inland might have a somewhat shorter ...


4

To expand on Mark's JHB-SYD suggestion, the Johannesburg to Sydney route generally does not go far enough south to sight Antarctica because it can take advantage of the winds in the Roaring 40s. However, SYD-JHB will sometimes travel within sight of Antarctica (if not actually over it for obvious reasons) to avoid those same winds. The below photo shows us ...


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