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3

There is no train yet. I would use Grab. You can pre-install the app on your phone and just buy a local SIM card at the airport just outside the arrival gate but still inside the building. If waiting is not a problem for you, there was a Grab booth in Terminal 3 last May 2019 when I last visited. (Grab Booths). When I was there the line was very long, and ...


2

By foot or taxi. There is no regular, scheduled public transport between the airport and the city centre.


2

The current options are (all prices quoted in USD): Take a taxi, either pre-booked or directly from a taxi stand at the airport. For example Cabo Transfers charges $85 for a one-way trip to/from the airport. Travel time is 40 minutes. Uber cannot pickup passengers at the airport due to pressure from the taxi industry, but you can use them to get from Cabo ...


15

I think you have enough time, but there is a not insignificant risk of missing your connection. You are flying with British Airways, who recommend a minimum connection time between the airports of three hours. Since you have 4:25, this is on paper, plenty of time. Since you're American, you'll be able to use the ePassport gates at Heathrow, joining the same ...


1

Under typical conditions, yes. But, you should consider asking to jump the immigration queues, though the last few years, this has not required me to wait more than 30 minutes.


2

It doesn't leave a massive amount of leeway in case of disruption to the flight into LHR, but it is likely to be enough in practice unless that flight is delayed by more than an hour or so. The usual rule of thumb I apply when travelling internationally to/from major airports is to arrive at the departure airport 2 hours before take-off, and not to book ...


2

ANA has a table on the minimum connecting time at Japan Domestic airports. It recommends at least 180 minutes (3 hours) for domestic-to-international transit between Haneda and Narita. In your case, you should be able to catch your flight, if everything is running on time. An alternative is to book your first leg of the flight straight into Narita, which ...


1

Yes, this should be plenty of time, there are busses and trains (I would generally recommend the train as it is more reliable) that run between the two airports without any changes. For example: the 13h02 train leaving Haneda would get to Narita at 14h37 giving you plent of time to check in.


3

There is a shuttle bus which costs 3,100 Yen and takes approximately 80 minutes (but this is heavily traffic dependent and could thus take longer). The train would take nearer to two hours, but is fairly predictable in terms of journey time. Add in time to get from the plane to baggage reclaim to the mode of public transport, and adding in an assumption ...


2

Yes, in principle these products expand. This happens due to the lower air pressure at high altitudes (which means there’s less force squashing them together, so they can spread themselves out a bit more). Airliners and other passenger planes operating at high altitude are pressurised, but typically only to air pressures typically found about 6000-8000ft (...


4

Where the report counts “passengers” it means passenger movements. Every time a passenger arrives or departs by air constitutes a passenger movement. A transit passenger makes two movements, one when arriving and one when departing. In your example you would be noted as one arriving international passenger and one departing domestic passenger. Edit: I ...


7

No, these shuttles are provided for hotel guests, not for anyone to use. Also, some cursory research by Googling seems to show that most major hotels on the strip do charge their guests for using the shuttle. The hotels that provide free shuttles tend to be not the ones you think of when you want to stay on the strip. Those that do offer a free shuttle ...


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