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2

Short Answer - This would depend on the carrier airlines. Bureau of Civil Aviation security mandates no separate ID is required for infants/minors travelling with their parents. The airlines may require an age proof to ensure infant qualifies for infant fare. If you don't provide a proof, you may need to pay full fare to travel. A birth certificate is ...


2

Personal experience : I think birth certificate would be sufficient.


0

Some points are already covered by other responders but there is at least one more point that is missed and I'd like to cover that (esp contrasting priorities as I'll explain). In terms of maintenance and fueling, they have to do that and pass the plane as inspected and still good to go before deciding to continue as the next flight. In terms of liability, ...


-1

Southwest's conditions of carriage say (page 29, which is page 30 of the PDF): 7. Baggage [...] i. Limitations of liability (1) General. The liability, if any, of Carrier for loss of, damage to, or delay in the delivery of Checked or carryon Baggage and/or its contents, with the exception of wheelchairs, mobility aids, and ...


7

Airlines are private companies and they're free to do, or not do, business with whoever they want, as long as they comply with local discrimination law. If you cause serious disruption to a flight, for example by being violent or obnoxiously drunk or harrassing the crew or your fellow passengers, the airline can decide that it doesn't want to do business ...


2

Unfortunately, racial discrimination is an extremely widespread problem. Nonetheless, various channels do exist that are supposed to address issues like the one you describe: Business: Complain to the airline. Legal: This probably won't help in your case, because most legal channels give recourse only when you suffer specific damage. If you are improperly ...


6

First may I empathize with your position, as it is unfortunate that anybody should be treated in this way. I think if you wish to deal with racism, you must take a different approach in your home country and in countries you visit. For your home country, fight the racism by supporting the causes that you know to be right. Follow your own judgment as fas as ...


0

Most boarding passes will have two times printed, the boarding time, and the departure time. Boarding time is typically 45 minutes before the departure time. Boarding is usually open for 15 minutes starting at the boarding time. If you do not get to the gate within 15 minutes of the boarding time, you are counted as a no-show. In Heathrow, you have to be ...


0

There are many intermediaries that will pursue a claim under the EU directive on your behalf: it's free for you if they can't obtain any compensation, and otherwise they take a percentage of the compensation. See discussion on Wikipedia. If you are not sure if you are eligible for compensation, you can always try filing your claim with such a service. It ...


5

I ran into this problem twice about 15 years ago with American Airlines – first time at the gate 10 minutes before scheduled departure, the second 15 minutes before, and each time already gone. Both times they rebooked me for later flights, but weren't apologetic about it. Second time, it completely messed up my itinerary (I needed to connect with someone ...


19

So anyhow, we reached there 2 min prior but were advised that the flight already left and the gate was closed. Say the flight "departure time" is 10:40:00 You simply can't arrive very close to that time. You have to arrive before the "gate closes". That's that. The time the gate closes is indeed given on the boarding pass stub, and elsewhere in many ...


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