100

I understand that logic doesn't always help in times of stress, but the first thing I want to assure you is that people are not going to run off with your things. This is something we all worry about but that essentially never happens. The folks who manage the checkpoint are monitoring and your things are not out there without you for more than a few seconds....


83

If there is no one on the bus/train/etc who currently needs the seat (or wheelchair space, where seats in that space exist) then it is perfectly okay to sit in it. Just be observant and be ready to get up if someone who does need it boards. They are not 'these seats can ONLY be used by someone with a priority need' seats, but 'these seats should be the ...


55

There is a website that I was hitherto completely unaware of that aims to cater for this need. Great British Public Toilet Map For tourists with smart phones it would be useful as it geolocates the nearest ones in their database (or allows manual search) and provides a facility to add crowd sourced toilet locations along with pertinent details. These ...


52

Flights JQ747/JQ748 are to/from Launceston Airport, which does not have aerobridges: Facilities at Launceston airport do not include aerobridges to board or disembark aircraft. All access onto the aircraft is via aircraft stairs or mechanical lifting equipment (Personal Assistance Device) operated by the airlines. I would strongly advise you to ...


47

Whenever you're planning a journey, consider if you really have to fly. I am Asperger myself, and I avoid flights (although not for the exact same reason as you). Between The Netherlands and the United Kingdom, there is absolutely no need to fly. There are three ferry links from The Netherlands to England: one to the south, one to the centre, and one to ...


41

He will be able to make it. I have seen many people with disabilities travel alone (I am a cabin crewmember) Let's break it down into a few elements (considering that you are going to use a major airline and not a LCC): Going to the airplane: almost all airlines/airports do provide free services for people who need help with moving. Many airports even ...


35

From an engineering point of view, a tram is a vehicle that takes electricity from somewhere (overhead wires or third rail underneath), use motors to convert this into torque, and spins wheels to move the tram. The obvious solution is put all this machinery at ground level, right next to the wheels, and put the passengers on top. Ta-dah, a high-floor tram. ...


35

Toilets are important, but not something to worry about. You don't need to make it this complicated. British people really don't mind when foreigners ask where is the nearest public toilet? We don't judge you for your unfortunate need. Go in any public place and ask. It requires no technology, and rather than planning your day around where the convenient ...


25

In the US, the TSA has a notification card and You or your traveling companion may consult the TSA officer about the best way to relieve any concerns during the screening process. The UK security process is not as clear, but https://www.gov.uk/airport-rights outlines the rights of disabled people at the airport. This website suggests Contact customer ...


22

The simplest way to answer this is to look at who would need that wheelchair and why. Typically planes don't have space for a wheelchair down the aisles, so disabled passengers have to use a special wheelchair on the plane, pushed by attendants. There isn't an alternative to this (unless you use a stretcher instead, but then you have a whole new set of ...


22

At Jefferson Station you should be fine, because there are only two platforms, one for trains going east (tracks 1 and 2) and one for trains going west (tracks 3 and 4). The train from Yardley to Jefferson goes the same direction as the train from Jefferson to Airport (west), so you shouldn't have to change platforms if you change trains at Jefferson. (See ...


20

Air Canada - "Wheelchairs and Mobility Aids" Special handling requirements apply to battery-powered mobility aids.   There is no discrimination against you, but you should expect a large wheelchair to go into cargo; rather than becoming a projectile or having larger batteries leak during a crash. See also the second link above regarding "Cargo Door ...


19

Your question is basically no different at all to any situation involving a passenger that does not understand the language that the demo is conducted in, which is why passenger carrying aircraft above a certain capacity are required by most national aviation regulatory bodies to supplement the demo with a flight safety card with illustrations depicting the ...


19

As someone with one of those "hidden disabilities" that make me unable to stand for prolonged periods at times (and especially in a moving bus or train), I'd say indeed use the seat if there's no other available but be prepared to give it up to someone who needs it more than you. It's not nice to have to ask someone to please give them a seat (more because ...


18

Cost, and speed. Some public transport companies report that low floor trams have 15% higher maintenance costs for the rolling stock, and 20% higher maintenance costs for the infrastructure on average (source in German). The low-floor designs typically also decrease the speed at which a tram can drive through a curve (usually 4–15 km/h in 20 m radius curve)...


18

Heathrow Airport provides golf buggies for passengers with mobility issues, I have seen these in operation. You may have to request special assistance from your airline at least 48 hours in advance. The key point is that your airline is responsible for ensuring boarding assistance, they should be the ones you liaise with. Heathrow also provides porterage for ...


17

The seat is reserved for people with disabilities. The images are designed to show: Someone in a wheelchair A hearing aid (someone hard of hearing) Someone who is blind or partially sighted The S3A pictogram - a symbol designed to show that a place is open, including and able to facilitate people with disabilities. More information can be found at: http://...


16

I can't speak about other countries, but in the USA, contact TSA at the airport ahead of time and describe your issues. Most likely they will arrange for a TSA agent to escort you through security. You'll still have to do everything you would normally have to do (show ID, take off shoes, scan luggage, etc.), but the escort will bypass the lines and get you ...


16

What you want here is the Avoiding stairs Tube guide, linked from the TfL Accessibility guides page. In this guide you will see that all the Heathrow stations, as well as King’s Cross St. Pancras, are marked with Lift access between street and platform, and additionally all have the Platforms with designated level access boarding point indication, which ...


15

Maybe you know it already, but might be helpful for other readers, too: wheelmap.org It's an OpenStreetMap where users can mark if places/buildings are wheelchair accessible. You can filter the map to only show places related to tourism. Also, at least in Germany, some cities/areas have accessibility guides that list accessible hotels, free time activities ...


15

The tourism office has a website "München accessible for all!" with lots of information. For assistance at the airport: Information about „barrier-free traveling at Munich's Airport“ as well as the brochure „Barrierefrei“ can be found here: www.munich-airport.de/ .. /barriere.. or phone +49 (0) 89 / 9 75 00 and Flughafen München GmbH, Postfach 231755, ...


15

It is not the flight/plane themselves that could be the problem, but the airport. If your friend's family member needs extra help to board the plane, then they should ask the airport/airline directly for assistance. (As soon as possible) For example, I assume they will go to Launceston airport in Tasmania. They have a "disability/accessibility plan" that ...


13

In addition to the other answers: make sure you minimize the number of connections make sure there is enough time for each connection That probably leaves you with Qatar going through Doha. KLM markets Amsterdam to Windhoek as a "direct" flight, but it actually stops in Luanda. It appears to be the same aircraft continuing (which isn't always guaranteed) ...


13

In general if there is a seat available, you should aim to remain seated while the train, bus or tram is moving. This is a simple safety consideration: it's more dangerous to be standing than seated in the event of a sudden stop or crash. This includes utilising any seats designated as priority. Priority seating labelling varies across networks, with the ...


13

Sleeper seats are surely more expensive than cramped economy class but some airlines do offer them. While you say you cannot sit on any other chair, I assume probably you can fly lying down. Some companies like Alitalia will allow you to travel in a stretcher. Looks like you need a friend or two with you to help with moving between the seat and your wheel ...


12

You can sit on them if no-one else is sitting in them. Be ready to offer your seat though. If there are other available seats you should sit there instead as some people may have hidden disabilities that you don’t know about. You also won’t have the inconvenience of having to change seats later. The person your offering it to might resent the implication ...


11

The general answer is, because rail-borne rolling stock is expensive, it is only rational to expect trams to have a long life cycle. It is not unusual to see trams which are 30 years old, and in some places you can meet trams built in something like the 1930s and still in use. Thus, because low-floor tram designs are relatively new (introduced in 1980s and ...


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