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The checks and scans for illegal or dangerous items required at airports for passengers and baggage.

2
votes
Most of the scanning rules rules are motivated by psychological effects ('whatever makes the public feel more secure'), not for their efficiency - in the US alone, in average 2-3 hand guns are known t …
answered Feb 13 by Aganju
5
votes
It certainly depends on the mood of the officer he swears to or threatens, but with high probability, they have a low threshold, and it is a felony. He can expect arrest, some nights in detention, wit …
answered Aug 18 '17 by Aganju
0
votes
[I have realized that the question is for the opposite direction: London-JFK-ATL. This answer is not wrong, but doesn't apply to this question. I am leaving it for now, as it might still be useful] N …
answered Oct 24 '18 by Aganju
9
votes
You pay for it (of course), as a part of your ticket. If you check the details of your ticket, you will see that a large part of it is from up to a dozen fees, for landing, starting, using airport fa …
answered Jul 1 by Aganju
2
votes
It solely depends on potential necessary terminal changes - check where your flight arrives, and where the other one departs; if they are in the same terminal, you can check in at the gate or the airl …
answered Oct 24 '18 by Aganju
4
votes
If you don't leave the United States, you do not need a passport - remember that most Americans have no passport at all. You do need a 'Secure Government Issued ID'. That could be - aside from a biom …
answered Jun 3 '16 by Aganju
5
votes
That is actually not correct; in the USA, you can fly domestically without an ID. Here is a link to TSA's website that explains it: https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/identification (scrol …
answered Jun 3 '17 by Aganju
3
votes
Generally, you have the right to decline any such activity, as you have the right to not answer some or all question. However, the officer has the right to deny you entry, and it probably would be the …
answered Nov 13 '18 by Aganju
5
votes
Typically, airlines will give you a 'Security Pass' (instead of a boarding pass) that allows you to go into the security area for that reason, up to the gate door. At the check-in, ask for it, togeth …
answered Jan 5 '16 by Aganju
2
votes
Full body scanners image the (outside) outline of your body, going through (most) clothing. Depending on how much it adds to your outline, it can or cannot be detected; if it is relatively flat, they …
answered Jan 7 '17 by Aganju
10
votes
There are many legal reason to have worked with explosives (anyone could make his own ammunition at home), and TSA agents know that of course, so there is not much to worry about. Having your membersh …
answered Aug 19 '18 by Aganju
6
votes
They are normally used for swimming/diving/kayaking/canyoning, as waterproof packaging (although they are a bit more sturdy then). I am not aware of any way to 'lock' them, but why would that be a con …
answered Jul 6 '16 by Aganju
4
votes
It might depend on what exactly the ingredients are, and especially which country you are going to. You will not have issues in the US. In the USA, a lot of medication can be bought over the counter …
answered Jan 28 '18 by Aganju