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I'm thinking about whether to pack a yukata for my next trip to Japan, and I'm thinking of scenarios where it's appropriate to wear a yukata, but it isn't already available.

I'm not worried about the cost of buying or renting a yukata, but I wouldn't want to buy another one outright as I already have two and buying a third one would be wasteful.

I'm also not worried about a yukata not being exactly my size - at 194 cm tall, I'm resigned to yukatas being a little bit short, just so long as I'm decent.

Is the following an accurate summary of the yukata situation in Japan, especially for men?

At ryokans or ryokan-like accommodation, or in onsens, you are likely to get supplied with a yukata for wearing while you're in the accommodation, so you don't need to bring your own.

At festivals, it's common to wear wafuku including yukatas. I assume that you have to bring your own.

In the touristy areas of cities associated with traditional Japan, such as Kyoto or Kanazawa, I've seen women wearing kimono (not yukata), and I've read about but not really seen men wearing kimono (not yukata), possibly rented. I assume yukata would be insufficient clothing for such scenarios.

At some celebrations (for example dinner parties at the programming conference RubyKaigi, which has a bit of a Japanese element to it), I've occasionally seen women wear some sort of wafuku, but I can't recall men doing so.

closed as primarily opinion-based by Giorgio, Rory Alsop, Gayot Fow, David Richerby, JonathanReez Aug 5 '17 at 8:56

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    @JonathanReez I anticipate this being expertise-based, not opinion-based. – Andrew Grimm Aug 2 '17 at 11:29
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    If you have found a need to buy one in the past and already have two of your own, why not simply pack one just in case.That way you are prepared for anything. – user13044 Aug 2 '17 at 16:06
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At ryokans or ryokan-like accommodation, or in onsens, you are likely to get supplied with a yukata for wearing while you're in the accommodation, so you don't need to bring your own.

Correct. I'm reluctant to assure that "every" ryokan supplies it, but over 99% do.

At festivals, it's common to wear wafuku including yukatas. I assume that you have to bring your own.

Do you mean "omatsuri" in the "festivals"? It is common to wear wafuku, especially yukata. However, yukata is used only in summer.

In the touristy areas of cities associated with traditional Japan, such as Kyoto or Kanazawa, I've seen women wearing kimono (not yukata), and I've read about but not really seen men wearing kimono (not yukata), possibly rented. I assume yukata would be insufficient clothing for such scenarios.

It is pretty awkward I believe. Also it is not appropriate to weak yukata except in summer. In any season but summer, yukata is used only inside.

At some celebrations (for example dinner parties at the programming conference RubyKaigi, which has a bit of a Japanese element to it), I've occasionally seen women wear some sort of wafuku, but I can't recall men doing so.

I don't know how it feels in RubyKaigi (I assume these types of conferences are more casual meetings... at least in Pythonic world, though I never attended these conferences so I don't know...), but it is not uncommon for women to wear wafuku in special situations, such as a wedding ceremony of her friend. It is rare for men, especially in Tokyo, though, and men prefer suits.


Why do men not wear wafuku?

There are some reasons behind, but the most likely reason is women have had more opportunities to wear wafuku than men. Most parents want to see their daughter to wear kimono when she gets 20 and participates in a coming-of-age ceremony. Another chance women have opportunities to wear kimono is a graduation ceremony in university.

On the other hand most younger men don't know how to wear wafuku nor have never or rarely worn it in his lifetime.

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