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I am an Indian Citizan holding a UK tourist visa (short stay, multi entry) issued from Singapore. I wish to travel to Dublin . Would I be entitled to enter Ireland. Note: I will first enter U.K. My visa doesn't have stamp of BIVS @british Irish visa scheme

Appreciate your response If anyone had experienced similar situation.

  • You're eligible for the visa waiver program as you're an Indian citizen. – nikhil Jul 27 '17 at 3:44
  • Thanks Nikhil, I checked on the website and it is very vaguely described there, it also says that visa should be issued from home country. Are you telling me with your personal experience? – Travelfreak Jul 27 '17 at 3:47
  • Unfortunately you need the BIVS endorsement to make use of the arrangement. – Rodney Hawkins Jul 27 '17 at 4:39
  • @Hawkins How can I get that done .. is there any online option. – Travelfreak Jul 27 '17 at 5:09
  • You need a BIVS amendment or a full ROI visa. But given it's the CTA you may be able to get away with it for a brief visit. It depends upon your appetite for risk and your outlook as to playing everything strictly by the book. – Gayot Fow Jul 27 '17 at 6:54
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First off let me start by saying that I'm not providing any legal advice. When in doubt, my mantra would be to follow @GayotFow's advice.

I've done this unknowingly in the past, without any consequence(at least not any that I know of). Based on my reading and understanding of the visa waiver program, this is permissible.

Travel to Ireland using a UK visa

You may be able to visit Ireland without applying for a separate Irish visa, if you have an eligible UK (short stay) visitor visa and you are a citizen of an approved country. Read how this works under the Short Stay Visa Waiver Programme. Travel between Ireland & UK using a single UK-Irish visa

You can visit Ireland and the United Kingdom using a single visa issued by either country, if you are a Chinese or Indian citizen. For instance: You can visit the UK (including Northern Ireland) without applying for a UK visa, if you have an Irish Visit (Tourist) Visa. You can visit Ireland without applying for an Irish visa, if you have an eligible UK (short stay) visitor visa. You can travel an unlimited number of times between each country with either visa, for as long as it is valid. Read how this works under the British-Irish Visa Scheme.

You're eligible for both the BIVS and the Short Stay Program.

Here's the excerpt from timatic -

The following are exempt from holding a visa:

Nationals of India with a valid C visa issued by the United Kingdom if they have first entered the United Kingdom and been granted a stay of 180 days in the United Kingdom. They are visa exempt for a maximum stay of 90 days in Ireland (Rep.) or until the end of the period of stay granted in the United Kingdom, whichever is shorter.

Passengers arriving in the United Kingdom, including Northern Ireland, and traveling to Ireland (Rep.), the visa waiver programme will apply and only a visa issued by the United Kingdom will be required. The visit to Ireland (Rep.) must be within the stay granted within the United Kingdom. Passengers are permitted to travel to a third country before traveling to Ireland (Rep.) if the visa issued by United Kingdom is still valid. Furthermore, re-entry into Ireland (Rep.) from a third country is permitted if the visa issued by the United Kingdom is still valid and period of the stay granted in the United Kingdom is still valid. Passengers with a long term visa must visit Ireland (Rep.) within a period of the current stay granted in the United Kingdom. Passengers arriving first in Ireland (Rep.) and traveling to the United Kingdom, including Northern Ireland, and then returning to Ireland (Rep.) will requre separate visas issued by Ireland (Rep.) and the United Kingdom. However the visa issued by the United Kingdom will be accepted under the visa waiver programme for the return journey to Ireland (Rep.).

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