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I am a Russian citizen who has a 3 years EU multi visa category C. I would like to legally rent an apartment in EU with a monthly payment for a long term, 2+ months. The idea is that I will be leaving and coming back to this potential apartment. Is it possible?

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    Which country in EU? – Kuba Jul 26 '17 at 20:57
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    I'm doing it right now. I'm a non-EU citizen, renting for 3 months in the EU. AFAIK it's 100% legal, I didn't consult a lawyer though. – ugoren Jul 26 '17 at 21:15
  • @Kuba Lithuania – Viktor Jul 26 '17 at 21:21
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    EU law says nothing about it. National law in a specific country might have restrictions but the main hurdle is probably landlords. Checking whether you are a resident isn't necessarily mandatory but they might favour residents for all sorts of reasons. That's assuming you are looking at 6+ months and hoping to get the lower long-term rental price. Renting a holiday home for 2 or 3 months should in any case be no problem. – Relaxed Jul 26 '17 at 22:52
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Talking about Germany, short-term rental in hotels or holiday apartments and long-term rental of an apartment are different market segments, with different regulations in some areas.

  • Most landlords will do some financial background checks of their tenant. You might come up empty on the most common check, which makes you appear as a "high-risk" tenant.
  • People are required to register with the municipal authorities in their place of residence. A hotel takes care of this for the guest, a landlord does not.
  • Tenants have to enter an individual contract with a power company, with readings of the meter when they move in or leave.

So even if there is no law against it, it might be impractical for just a few months. Subletting might be more practical.

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