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I am currently in a summer session in a university in the US and I will be travelling back to London, next month.

I was wondering if there is any problem with bringing computer parts back to London, from San Francisco, in my case.

I wanted to build a PC desktop and processor can be found cheaper here, so wanted to bring one back. I understand I may need to declare it on entry but is there any other legal restrictions?

Note: Not sure if it makes a difference but I am on a student visa in the UK and hold a residence card (not permanent).

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    I used to buy lots of electronics visiting the US back when US dollar was much cheaper. It is never a problem as long as you do not have an intention to sell those items. I would recommend throwing away original boxes. – ThisIsMyName Jul 19 '17 at 20:04
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Actual regulation:

Bringing goods into the UK

You can bring in other goods worth up to £390 (or up to £270 if you arrive by private plane or boat).

If a single item’s worth more than your allowance you pay any duty or tax on its full value, not just the value above the allowance.

Examples: In 2017 summer, this is about 500 USD. The post title asked about Intel CPUs. Consumer CPUs, even the i7 7700K are definitely below. Some enthusiast CPUs are sold right at or below this limit, like the i7 7800X is ~$540 at Newegg but around $400 at Amazon and $420 at BHP. Shop carefully to stay under the limit. (Footnote: consider the Ryzen 1800X as well.)

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You should also check if the US has any export restrictions for the parts you want to bring. I don't think there will be, since you're just talking about common consumer parts, but it's still possible that they fall under some definition for a restricted item.

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    This is nonsense on oh so many levels. Most importantly the United States does not have a blanket export control on high end chips, there is a list of entities that you can't sell them to and that's the end of this story. – chx Jul 30 '17 at 19:29
  • Oh, well sorry for making the suggestion that they double-check then. – PunctualEmoticon Aug 1 '17 at 2:29

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