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When traveling to the UK, I understand my immigration history of travel will be recorded electronically. Couple of questions to clarify:

  1. Does the electronic record hold only the travel and arrival dates or the entire history ?
  2. Entire history I mean, say if you had applied asylum and returned back to India voluntarily and not being deported will that appear as well?
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    "I understand my immigration history of travel will be recorded electronically": from where do you get this understanding? Who do you imagine will be creating this electronic record? Where do you imagine it will be stored? – phoog Jun 29 '17 at 12:46
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    @phoog I think he intends to follow up this question travel.stackexchange.com/questions/96123/deportation-symbol/… with this one. This applies to the UK. – Rodney Hawkins Jun 29 '17 at 13:08
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Recent travel history is mostly recorded electronically. The further you go back though, the more likely it is that an electronic record does not exist.

It really depends on the country and I would say that this question is too broad to give an answer that covers all nations for the past who-knows-how-many-years.

The main answer though is that each country records travel history from its own perspective. They can get each date someone entered and exited with the name and passport number used. When you change passports, in most countries you get a new number, so they must rely on other data to make a match which is not entirely reliable. However, they are unlikely to know your travel history outside of the country.

A country does not even necessarily known where you are arriving from since airlines do not always send passenger data to immigration. For example, here in Ecuador, they know the entry and exist of each person but if you look up travel history records, the origin will often be stated as the nation of the passport used to enter, even if that is not actually the case.

A few countries have no exit immigration. US, Canada and the UK, as far as I know, so they rely on external data to know when people leave. With exits via passenger airlines, this data tends to be very reliable but when exiting by land or water, exit information is rather spotty. There are countries with no border controls, some with controls between at some borders, so there are many places where travel history simply cannot be tracked.

Some countries and regions share data between them so they can know about travel history outside their country but this is more of an exception than the norm.

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    Thank you @itai .. I had travelled to uk with my old passport and returned back to India after few years. I was not deported from uk but there was a code in my passport which was enquired by Indian immigration due to my stupid asylum claim in the U.K. .. Then I had to change the passport .. then I had been to one south Asian country and that's it ... With this new passport ... I m planning to get a Irish visa so while issuing visa at the Irish embassy in India would they be to just see that I had returned from uk on this date or will they see have informationabout me claiming asylum aswell ? – Mathur Jun 30 '17 at 0:21
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    Not sure since I don't work for any embassy. The UK has no exit control, even they may don't know when you left. So it depends if the country which you went to from you UK exit shared that info which I would find unlikely. We can't know for sure as most of this info is not publicly accessible. – Itai Jun 30 '17 at 1:20
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    @Mathur, you can be sure that the UK and Ireland share a lot of data. They are both part of the Common Travel Area. You can also be sure that the UK has the asylum information. – o.m. Jun 30 '17 at 4:32
  • @o.m. This is increasingly true... but does not really follow from the CTA. The CTA was created in 1923 and as recently as 2013, data exchange was limited to warnings from intelligence agencies, not including adverse immigration history. – Relaxed Jun 30 '17 at 6:38
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    That's the part about sharing information. We do not know who shares what info with who but we do know some do. Ireland and UK have close ties, so they are likely to share more than Ireland and India for example. – Itai Jul 1 '17 at 17:06
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  • Many states have electronic records on travelers. Among many other things, these records are used to fight crime and terrorism, so the states do not tell the whole truth about how much they collect, how long they store the records, and what they do with them. In some cases, visa officials may not be allowed to see all the data a state has!
  • Some state let people ask about the content of some of these public records. Not all of them.
  • Many states exchange some data with other states. Examples include the Schengen Information System and the Five Eyes treaty.

So when you are dealing with a Western government, the safe assumption is that they know any adverse travel history. You are still required to provide the information in your application, of course. If what you write differs from their information and they believe you, they might update their databases. If what you write differs from their information and they believe in their databases, your chances of getting a visa are close to zero (UK example).

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    Actually, the SIS does not contain any records of a person's travel history Even events such as being denied entry are not part of it. Only an active ban would be. The Five Eyes alliance is about intelligence and, in spite of persistent rumours on this site, I have never seen any evidence that border guards really have extensive access to these data or that regular immigration violations (as opposed to intelligence regarding terrorism) would be shared between Five Eyes nations. All in all, I think this answer overstates the extent of data exchange in this domain. – Relaxed Jun 30 '17 at 6:24
  • @relaxed ... So I won't be refused when I apply for a visa to Ireland day student visa ... Although I had applied for asylum in the uk and got refused .. And returned back to India voluntarily !! Will I be able to secure a visa in future ? – Mathur Jun 30 '17 at 12:07
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    @Mathur No, I didn't write this, I was just adding some nuances. I have no idea whether you will be refused or not. It also depends on the rest of your application and how long all this was. – Relaxed Jun 30 '17 at 12:49
  • @Relaxed, I'm advising the OP to take the worst case assumption in his situation, i.e. that Ireland will know all the messy details and act accordingly. So he had better be honest and explain why they are no longer a problem. – o.m. Jun 30 '17 at 16:58
  • OP??! Do you think they will be convinced and grant us visa !! Any cases you know of had secured visa to a country where he was deported or applied asylum and refused – Mathur Jun 30 '17 at 18:06
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Many countries do keep some record of travel history (entries and exits) or demand that airlines provides them with passenger manifests for all flights originating or landing there. At the same time, these records are still less systematic than many people imagine. For example, there is to this day no comprehensive record of entries and exits of foreign nationals in the Schengen area and no systematic exchange of travel history data between Schengen countries. More relevant to your question, data exchange between the UK and Ireland have only recently been ramped up but it does appear to be substantial.

You have however mentioned an asylum application and data collection and sharing is somewhat more systematic in this area. In particular, the EU created a database called EURODAC to record all asylum applications. If you are found staying illegally or otherwise give grounds for the police to run your name or fingerprints through this database, you can expect your earlier application to be found. I am not sure whether the Irish consulate would routinely query it for a regular visa application but there is definitely a record of all this.

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    You're disclosing new facts all the time, how could I possibly know the answer to your question? Now it seems you were detained, were you given any papers regarding your situation? You might want to ask a new question about that. In any case, note that what might or might not be in this database is not the only thing you need to worry about. You may be asked about being refused a visa or being removed in the past and if you fail to disclose the details of what happen it can have very serious consequences down the line. Deception is a very dangerous strategy. – Relaxed Jun 30 '17 at 12:54
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    @Mathur No I cannot tell you this. I answered a specific question, please don't ask other questions in comments. Many other details would be necessary to address this new question and even with those details, I would probably not be able to tell you much more. But if you're happy with saying the truth, then it's kind of moot what's in which database, disclose it all and see what happens. – Relaxed Jul 1 '17 at 0:19
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    @Mathur What I meant it doesn't matter whether the asylum application was recorded since you will be disclosing it yourself. I am not saying it cannot influence the visa decision. Also, Ireland is in the EU. – Relaxed Jul 1 '17 at 9:15
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    @Mathur At this point, you are asking question after question, going in all directions without paying attention to what was being said. This is not what comments are for, you should consider moving to the chat. – Relaxed Jul 1 '17 at 9:17
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    @Mathur Have you read what I just wrote? I asked you not to ask questions in comments. And the UK ban is a major difference! – Relaxed Jul 1 '17 at 10:50

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