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Is an electric scooter similar to this one generally accepted as checked-in baggage when travelling by flight?

Hello,

I am in Shenzhen today. My bicycle is pretty heavy so i am considering buying an electric scooter. You can see the links below for example, these are basic scooters without seat which look like skateboards with handlebars pretty much.

The ones below are just examples. The one I am thinking about weighs 12.5 kilo.

The question is if flights in general will accept to carry one of these electric scooters as checked-in baggage or if they will refuse?

That's it. Hope you guys can provide useful answers.

Vesa

Links (Note that these are just examples and not exactly similar to the model I am thinking about):

https://www.inlinex.com.sg/products/citybug2?utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=googlepla&variant=29394099079&gclid=CKvX97fW09QCFcoTaAod_MoKrA

http://www.lazada.sg/catalog/gallery/?sku=OE702SPAA81LGISGAMZ enter image description here

  • If it's properly packed within the weight and size limits then it'll be okay. However, if it contains a lithium-ion battery, it may be refused carriage depending on the airline's policies. – Calchas Jun 23 '17 at 10:33
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It depends on the airline and possibly legal regulations in the countries you are flying in. Electric scooters or footbikes are usually powered with a lithium ion battery and this battery usually exceeds the capacity limits on lithium ion batteries both in cabin or checked luggage.

CityBug2, the first scooter you are linking to, e.g. has a 268.8Wh lithium battery. The FAA regulations (if applicable on the flight) only allows batteries up to 100Wh (cabin or checked) and in addition (but depending on airline policies) a limited number of batteries between 100 and 160Wh in cabin luggage. Batteries larger than 160Wh are generally prohibited. European airlines usually operate with the same limitations on flights in Europe.

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    Sounds like Vesa is flying out of Shenzhen or probably Hong Kong rather than the US. The Chinese are very strict about lithium-ion batteries in terms of enforcement compared to the TSA. Hong Kong is not quite so bothered. – Calchas Jun 23 '17 at 10:49

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