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I have the dates on my Visa C stamped from 7-21 May however my flight leaves on 22 at 11 a.m. from Germany to Indonesia. So technically, the overstay would be less than 12 hours. What would happen? (fines, airline, etc.) My flight leaves at 11 a.m, that means I have to check myself in at the airline check in counter 3 hours prior departure.

Should I just stay at the airport from the night before to reduce the chances of being considered as illegal alien? I have tried to reschedule my flight, but no flights are available on 21 (using the same airline). What should I tell the immigration/border control?

marked as duplicate by chx, Ali Awan, Gayot Fow, JonathanReez May 2 '17 at 9:23

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    @chx The question you are linking to is not a duplicate, as it is about the consequences for having overstayed. This question is more about preventing an overstay, even if the flight leaves one day after visa expiration, which in many cases is possible. – Tor-Einar Jarnbjo May 2 '17 at 8:41
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Definitely go to the airport and pass immigration before your visa runs out, 1 hour or 1 year makes no difference and it is your problem to have a flight that leaves on time, the exact issues you might have are not public but for sure overstaying won't look good the next time you apply for a visa, you can also go to the airport and try get an extension for 24 hours, this worked for me twice before albeit not in schengen but it's always better to be there before your visa runs out than after

  • Your answer presupposes that they will let her through immigration when her flight is still 11 hours away. I don't think that's a slam dunk; to the contrary, I think there are airports where it would not be permitted. I think when I was at MAD they called people up to the leaving-Schengen boarding area, which is when they do immigration, by flight. – Andrew Lazarus May 3 '17 at 6:14
  • If they don't they most likely will help with the remainder of the stay, that happened to me on a few occasions. I agree they might not let her pass but they are very unlikely to also just turn her away – Matt Douhan May 3 '17 at 7:30

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