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I'm considering moving into a rented premises for a month or so. But the landlord's agent would keep a duplicate key of the door.

The landlord suggests that I should keep all valuables in the cupboard, to which my own lock can be affixed, because the agent might inspect the property at will.

I have some valuables which don't fit in the cupboard, but are liable to be stolen easily by a visitor.

So I'm looking for some help on any attachments or temporary locks for the main door, which can be affixed while leaving the house and would act as an additional lock, to prevent unauthorised entry.

closed as off-topic by DJClayworth, Ali Awan, Kate Gregory, David Richerby, JonathanReez Apr 30 '17 at 20:36

  • This question does not appear to be about traveling within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    Wouldn't this break your contract with the landlord? In theory you might as well swap the locks. – JonathanReez Apr 30 '17 at 11:43
  • I'm not sure of that – DS R Apr 30 '17 at 12:21
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it doesn't appear to be about travel. – DJClayworth Apr 30 '17 at 15:10
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    @DJClayworth Never rented a guesthouse during holiday/travel from which you make your daily tours? So why it is not travel-related? – Thorsten S. Apr 30 '17 at 20:41
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    I am amazed at the side tracked ranting on this question. The OP asked a simple question about devices to secure a door of a temporary abode. Rather than address the question, the majority of posters have attacked the OP using their hometown's laws as proof of the OP's unlawful intentions. We don't know where this is taking place, therefore you DO NOT KNOW the applicable laws. The "I know-it-all because my country does it that way" participants here are amazingly naive. – user13044 May 1 '17 at 5:34
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Not sure they are available in your area, but there are cylindrical covers that go over the door knob and are secured with a standard padlock. With the cover in place you can't twist the knob nor access the keyhole. The downside, it is pretty obvious when you aren't at home.

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    The other downside in this case is that if you deny the owner of the property legitimate access to it, they're completely entitled to cut the device off and bill you for the privilege. And throw you out of the accommodation for being in breach of your contract. So, you know... don't do this. – David Richerby Apr 30 '17 at 18:21
  • That completely depends on the country. In many countries, luckily, it would be totally illegal for a landlord to enter a tenant house without the permission of the tenant, and in those countries the law does not allow a rental contract to contradict/supersede this. Since the OP hasn't stated country, it is not possible to meaningfully answer this quesiton. – Erwin Bolwidt Apr 30 '17 at 20:32
  • @DavidRicherby - where I live, it is legal to do such. But ultimately the question is about devices, not the legality of doing so which varies from government to government.. – user13044 May 1 '17 at 5:40
  • Yes, I'm looking for device tips. I can negotiate the permission from the owner – DS R May 2 '17 at 1:57
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It is the norm for a landlord or his/her agent to have a key to an accommodation they own or rent. Landlord/tenant laws often include an access condition to the effect that they have to give the tenant advance notice before they enter. Were you to deny them access, locking them out by whatever means, you may violate your lease agreement. Depending upon circumstances, they may have the right to break through the new lock, charge you for that, decide that you are in violation, tell you to leave.

@SpehroPefhany makes a valuable observation:

Usually there is an exception to the notice clause that in case of emergency no notice is necessary. For example, if a pipe burst in the tenants apartment and was causing damage to that and other units, the landlord should be able to enter after a bit of reasonable knocking or whatever.

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    Usually there is an exception to the notice clause that in case of emergency no notice is necessary. For example, if a pipe burst in the tenants apartment and was causing damage to that and other units, the landlord should be able to enter after a bit of reasonable knocking or whatever. – Spehro Pefhany Apr 30 '17 at 17:03
  • @SpehroPefhany you're absolutely correct and an important point +1; I will edit in your comment; it certainly adds value; thx. – Giorgio Apr 30 '17 at 17:42
  • "the norm" - maybe in some countries. Where I was raised, it was ILLEGAL to do that. It is trespassing for a landlord to access a tenant's accomodations without express permission. Legally enforcable. – TomTom Apr 30 '17 at 19:25
  • @TomTom perhaps better said as 'uncommon' or 'unusual?' The statement is that it is normal for them to have a key, but not enter, though. – Giorgio Apr 30 '17 at 19:56

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