I know that none of the 5-Eyes countries stamp passports after visa refusals anymore (bad idea in my opinion). The UK does stamp passports when an application is received. However, USA has stopped stamping passports with "Application Received."

When has this trend towards electronic records without any stamps on the passport begun? Australia doesn't even have visa stickers anymore.

closed as too broad by Honorary World Citizen, Giorgio, David Richerby, JonathanReez Apr 12 '17 at 13:29

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  • Supposedly per the replies I received, the UK still stamps visa refusals. My refusal from 2015 had no stamp. Question is too broad though. Five eyes countries do not act in unison. – Honorary World Citizen Apr 11 '17 at 17:58
  • @Sheik Paul Was your passport stamped in anyway? In 2013, I had a stamp that to show my application was processed, but nothing that said "refused." My question asks how the general trend has changed with the introduction of computers and biometrics. My UK visas from the 90s are stamps manually filled. – greatone Apr 11 '17 at 18:14
  • @Sheik Paul What evidence is there of a refusal? Did you submit biometrics? – greatone Apr 12 '17 at 11:47
  • I did not receive the visa. Isn't that the surest evidence of a refusal :-)? I was bounced, accused of money laundering, and subsequently interrogated and detained when I visited UK this year without a visa. I submitted biometrics for the visa, yes. – Honorary World Citizen Apr 12 '17 at 11:52
  • @Sheik Paul That's unfortunate. Did they ever fingerprint you? The non-interview decision making process is one-sided and unfair. It doesn't given the applicant the opportunity to explain despite having paid a ridiculous sum of money for his/her application to be evaluated based on legal principles. – greatone Apr 12 '17 at 11:54