6

We'll be applying for our Schengen visas via the Netherlands embassy. Since the purpose of our visit is tourism, it would be dishonest to apply for a visit visa. I do have a close cousin living in Amsterdam, so I am wondering if she can act as a guarantor that we will leave Schengen within the stipulated time? I know they have a detailed sponsorship form but that doesn't apply to us. So wondering if we can make something like this work in order to strengthen our case?

This might sound unnecessary to most of you but we're from a country that isn't very well received in Europe or North America, so....

  • 3
    The problem is, a guarantor can never actually guarantee you will leave... they can't stop you walking out of their house and disappearing. So such a thing is worthless. – Moo Apr 7 '17 at 9:15
  • 2
    "Since the purpose of our visit is tourism, it would be dishonest to apply for a visit visa." Um, what? Why? Do you think visas are not issued for tourism? – Henning Makholm Apr 7 '17 at 9:39
  • These are two different kinds of Schengen visas that you can apply for (1) Visit Family/Friends, and (2) Tourist Visa. You have to tick one in the application form. – Saadia Apr 8 '17 at 17:26
7

A sponsor can make an offer to provide economic support and member states are allowed to have instruments that they can use to make the offer binding. You seem to have already examined the instrument the Netherlands uses and have concluded that it does not suit your needs. You want to know if your sponsor can submit an attestation of good character on your behalf.

wondering if we can make something like this work in order to strengthen our case?

No full stop. A sponsor cannot guarantee that an applicant will honour the terms and conditions of their visa. The rationale is quite simple: people are not telepathic and so a sponsor has no way of knowing your intent. Moreover, it is empirically sound to state that close friends and relatives will not turn an abuser over to the authorities (that activity falls to neighbours and co-workers and spurned lovers who are not generally sponsors anyway).

Instead, close friends and relatives may be prone to harbouring and this is something to consider very carefully in how your material is presented.

There is nothing in the Visa Code that says a person is forbidden from submitting an attestation of good character on behalf of an applicant, but this type of evidence is ignored and in the worst case demonstrates naivety in understanding how visa decisions are actually made. There are some horrible examples floating around on the net; avoid them.

This might sound unnecessary to most of you but we're from a country that isn't very well received in Europe or North America, so....

There are some nationalities where their performance history is unfortunate. This can make things more awkward for innocent and well-intended applicants. One 'work-around' that I have used successfully is to elaborate/expose an elevated social standing for the applicant and his family. Maybe such a strategy will work for you.

  • 1
    What about the German instrument where the sponsor leaves a large deposit to guarantee the person in question will return? – JonathanReez Apr 7 '17 at 9:56
  • @JonathanReez you may have misunderstood the Verpflichtungserklärung. The deposit is to cover the costs of enforced removal (§§ 66, 67 of the Residence Act). It does not guarantee the applicant will return because such guarantees are not enforceable in Germany (or any other Schengen state). See service.berlin.de/dienstleistung/120691 – Gayot Fow Apr 7 '17 at 10:07
  • @gayot But the Verpflichtungserklärung does strengthen the case in Germany... It can also delegate the need to prove sufficient funds to the hosting party. Also there is no need for a deposit if the host has sufficient income, he'll just get the bill later in the mail :-) – LLlAMnYP Apr 7 '17 at 15:27
  • @LLlAMnYP Having a Verpflichtungserklärung does not act as a guarantee of intent. If they think the applicant will abuse a visa or overstay, they will refuse the application even if a Verpflichtungserklärung is presented. There are lots of such cases in the archives here. – Gayot Fow Apr 7 '17 at 18:14
  • @gayot I of course never said anything about a guarantee and i discussed this in an answer on this site, but an appropriate combination of the Verpflichtungserklärung and a correspondingly filled out visa application reduces the necessary documents for the applicant. – LLlAMnYP Apr 7 '17 at 19:36
6

Unfortunately, having a family member in the country you are wishing to visit usually raises more red flags than anything else. The immigration officer reviewing your visa application is likely to think that you are trying to immigrate illegally in the country to come live with that family member. Therefore, I do not think that using them as a guarantee that you will leave the country will be effective in any way, nor that such a concept might even exist.

The only way to prove that you intend to leave the Schengen area within the stipulated time, is to demonstrate that you have strong ties to your home country. These include all sorts of commitments which indicate that you live a stable life in your home country and are not looking to emigrate anywhere, such as and not limited to:

  • A stable job
  • A full-time school/university/course to attend
  • Economic interests / assets / real estates / property
  • A family / spouse / elderly parents / relatives
  • Social ties

It is obviously up to you to detail your situation in your visa application, and to bring all valid documents supporting your case when you attend the interview.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.