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  1. My uncle will travel and stay at serviced apartments (whose structure and interior he must not change), across Canada for work where the tap water is normally safe, but he needs Reverse Osmosis (hereafter RO) water for health reasons.

  2. APEC's portable countertop RO system's Diverter Valve (DV) must be connected to the faucet's Male Threads (MT), and so does not help, because even if the apartments' faucets use MT, the MT's size may not match the DV's.

marked as duplicate by mts, Giorgio, Ali Awan, Olielo, JonathanReez Apr 7 '17 at 6:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • @brhans There is no duplication: 2 above explains why the RO system in that linked post fails. – Greek - Area 51 Proposal Apr 6 '17 at 19:59
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    Reverse Osmosis requires pressure to work - which is why they need to be connected up to the faucet. Unless you'd consider lugging around a setup of water tanks and a pump I think you're SOL... – brhans Apr 6 '17 at 20:06
  • What is it he needs filtered out? – DJClayworth Apr 6 '17 at 20:08
  • Just a thought, maybe some sort of big-bottle-refilling service might be easier, similar to those companies that supply offices with water cooler water? Here's an example in Cambodia surely it must exist in Canada too and I'd hope they'd meet the appropriate filtering standards? – user568458 Apr 11 '17 at 18:18
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    p.s. I've also voted to re-open and I've editted the title to try to make the difference with your previous question more obvious – user568458 Apr 11 '17 at 18:24
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That's what that thing is! Sorry, yesterday I found a mysterious little tube that had 2 different threads of slightly different diameters on it. It's the gadget that solves your problem. It's for fitting a device which has a female thread (wants a male on the faucet) to a faucet which has a female thread.

enter image description here

They are listed with names like "faucet adaptor" or "dual thread adaptor".

They typically come free with devices which go on faucets, and are either used in the first installation and left behind... or promptly lost or thrown away with the packaging. Any decent hardware store should sell them.

"Adaptor kits" also exist which claim to cover every possibility and include washers:

enter image description here

Now, when you leave, you will probably find the adapter has attached itself to the faucet and will refuse to come out. In that case, the original aerator won't fit anymore. Just get a simple aerator that fits it, install that, test and walk away.

In a general sense, however... The answer is get good at adapters. They make many more shapes and sizes.

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    Thanks, but is your answer missing links or references? Your first sentence starts with that, but what's its Referent? What little tube do you mean? – Greek - Area 51 Proposal Apr 8 '17 at 14:29
  • @user568458 you got it! – Harper Apr 12 '17 at 5:20
  • Nice edit! I used that image to look up the names these things are listed under and added an example "adaptor kit" which might make things easier, hope you don't mind! – user568458 Apr 12 '17 at 11:11

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