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Question is pretty clearly stated in the title. I know that by Iranian law, children of citizens are considered citizens themselves. But, what if this person/child, who is now an adult, has no Iranian citizenship themselves.

This person has citizenship in an EU country that is (of course) not on the list of effected countries.

Will US Immigration allow this person to enter the country? Will US Immigration consider this person to also be a citizen of Iran based on the citizenship of their parent?

  • Even people who have visited Iran have been recently refused entry on that basis, despite holding the appropriate US visa. – Calchas Jan 31 '17 at 13:05
  • @Calchas You have a link to such a story? Haven't heard any of those yet (and would apply to me and a lot of people on TSE). – Some wandering yeti Feb 1 '17 at 8:17
  • @ptityeti The story was here: twitter.com/7NewsMelbourne/status/826017457076793347 But it's worth saying that at the time the Executive Order from Trump was ambiguous and CBP did not really know what they were supposed to be doing. Today you may find the same circumstances are absolutely okay. – Calchas Feb 1 '17 at 9:17
  • @Calchas Interesting. But I don't hear in that story that he held a visa. He might have tried to enter on the VWP (e.g. ESTA approved prior to the Obama Iran rule) in which case it would have nothing to do with the Trump stuff. – Some wandering yeti Feb 1 '17 at 18:27
  • "I know that by Iranian law, children of citizens are considered citizens themselves. But, what if this person/child, who is now an adult, has no Iranian citizenship themselves." So, what are you saying? That the child applied to renounce Iranian citizenship and this application was approved? Otherwise, they are still an Iranian citizen. – user102008 Feb 1 '17 at 23:08
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There is no canonical answer for this question, at the moment.

That said, there's a good chance these children would be barred entry. In fact, this has already happened.

http://gizmodo.com/australian-teen-denied-visa-for-space-camp-in-us-becaus-1791770012

  • I wonder if the boy mentioned in this article had an iranian passport of his own, or if the US officials "inferred" his iranian citizenship because his parent(s) have iranian citizenship – thowman123 Jan 31 '17 at 13:11
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    To me, the wording of the article suggests the boy does not hold an Iranian passport. But... I do wonder how the boy was banned. If he was born in Australia, there is nothing that suggests he might have dual nationality. Sure, he has an Iranian name, but so do hundreds of thousands of Americans. And fifth generation Iranians, say, anywhere. – MastaBaba Jan 31 '17 at 13:57
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    @MastaBaba The State Department had an ambiguous and wide Executive Order and a visa application which gave the nationality of his parents as Iranian. "How" is not really at issue here, no one is entitled to a visa and given the political climate the consulate probably felt the Administration would rather they decline to issue the visa. – Calchas Feb 1 '17 at 9:19

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