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I am a Non - EU citizen, studying in Italy.I have recently submitted my passport for visa application to another country. Does anyone has idea if I can take flight from Torino to Bari ( domestic flight by Ryan air and blue air) by showing my residence permit.

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    @JonathanReez: Not a duplicate; this question is for a domestic flight that does not go to another Schengen country. The real question seems to be which ID Ryanair will accept (and perhaps also whether Ryanair attempts to enforce legal immigration status for domestic passengers). – Henning Makholm Jan 19 '17 at 14:20
  • Yes this is the real question !! I do not know why it is showing that it is a duplicate question. I wanted to know if residence permit is allowed for taking domestic flight in Italy. – Neha Mehta Jan 19 '17 at 14:28
  • Yes Per Alitalia, Besides an identity card, passport and driver's license (paper or laminated), the documents listed in Italian Presidential Decree 445/2000 are also valid for travel inside the country. – user 56513 Feb 15 '17 at 16:37
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No, not only with the residence permit. Both airlines require that you present a valid id when checking in and/or embarking the airplane.

Ryanair has a very complex and not easily understandable list of accepted id documents. For domestic travel within Italy, passengers over 15 years of age must be able to present one of these documents:

  • Valid passport
  • Valid National ID card* see issuing countries below
  • Any valid driving licence with photo
  • Nautical licence
  • Pension Card/Book
  • Heating Installation licence
  • Firearm licence
  • ID card/badges with photo, issued and stamped by the Administration.
  • Identification cards issued to civil servants and army soldiers.
  • AT/BT Card.

So, a residence permit will not suffice. If you have a driver's licence though, you seem good to go.

Blue Air does not list exactly which documents are accepted, but state in their conditions of carriage, paragraph 6.2 that passengers must present 'a valid identity document, identity card or passport' at check-in. Residence permits are not considered identity documents and will not fulfill this requirement.

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Yes, you can.

When you fly within the Schengen area (a fortiori on a domestic flight within the area), an airline can only check your ID to ascertain that you are the plane ticket holder, since you're automatically allowed to travel thanks to freedom of movement in the Schengen area. Most of the time, they won't even bother looking at your documentation since what interests them is simply that you have a valid plane ticket.

If you were illegaly in Italy, the airlines could notify the police of their suspicions about your unlawful presence, which would likely entail detention by the Italian police. But with a residence permit, I don't see why the airlines would notify the police.

If your residence permit doesn't show your picture, make sure to bring a valid ID (to prove that you're the ticket holder) with your name and photo - it can be documentation from your own country.

  • Can you reference anything that prevents the airline from deciding for themselves to want more documentation than they have to? Ryanair is somewhat infamous for doing that for flights betwee Schengen countries. – Henning Makholm Jan 20 '17 at 10:40
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    Italy has strict rules for id even on domestic flights, this answer is unsourced and likely wrong. – mts Jan 20 '17 at 13:59
  • Ryanair does check id's. Also, some airports ask an id when going through security (personal experience). You'll need to carry an identification document that is considered valid in Italy. This may be an Id card, or in some countries a driver's permit. To know which documents are considered a valid identification, please refer to other answers or the website of the Italian government. Most west-European countries have papers that are valid as id, which could be a proof of identity while processing an Id card or similar. Again, to know which papers are valid, refer to other answers or gov. site – Bertware Jan 20 '17 at 14:18

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