2

I had recently entered the UK without a visa to be with my partner, from 21 July 2016 until 16 December 2016. I hope to return on the 9th of January. We don't meet the income requirement for a Spouse visa. I recently applied to university, and got in, and was intending to return to the UK on a student visa, but my university did not tell me about maintenance fees and my loan wasn't large enough to cover it all, so my visa would have been denied. Now, I am hoping to attend university in the next semester, and therefore return to the US to apply for that visa. Do you think that if I try to return to the UK without a visa, I will be turned away? I won't be working or studying during this time, however, I'm afraid that they'll consider it living in the UK illegally; I don't have a criminal record or anything like that.

  • 5
    It does sound like trying to "live in the UK for extended periods through frequent or successive visits", which is not allowed as a general visitor. The risk of being denied entry with your travel history is substantial, especially if they get wind of you having a romantic partner in the UK. – hmakholm left over Monica Dec 28 '16 at 22:27
  • 1
    If you get an entry clearance beforehand, you'll be just fine. Otherwise the comment from @HenningMakholm kicks in and you can expect a rigorous landing interview. – Gayot Fow Dec 28 '16 at 22:49
  • 1
    Above I was assuming that when you say "on a visitor visa" what you actually mean is fly to the UK and seek entry as a non-visa national. If you have an actual visa ("entry clearance", i.e. you apply to the embassy and get a sticker in your passport before you travel), different rules apply, as @Gayot alludes to. – hmakholm left over Monica Dec 28 '16 at 23:36
6

The UK gov website for the standard UK visitor visa covers this exact scenario:

Your visa may be cancelled and you may get a long-term ban on visiting if your travel history shows you’re repeatedly living in the UK for extended periods.

https://www.gov.uk/standard-visitor-visa/eligibility

  • Couldn't have said it more plainly than that. – Burhan Khalid Jan 2 '17 at 5:13

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.