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We were due to fly to Canada 4 weeks ago where we found out at the checking point that we were supposed to have ETA visa. This was launched by Canadian governments just three weeks before we were due to fly. This was obviously after we bought the tickets and the only reminder was on the ticket was about applying for ETA if we were going to USA. We were quite early so managed to apply for the visa and had two applications processes on time and the last one took three hours to get the visa which by then the flight had taken off. We were also told that because we didn't check in, the return flight was cancelled as well so we had to buy a return tickets for three of us again using a different airline. Do we have a right to apply for refund? is the airline or the agency responsible to make passengers aware of any changes after a ticket bought?

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    In short, no, it is your own responsibility to make sure you meet the visa conditions. As unfortunate as that is in your case, the airline has no legal responsibility to inform their passengers upfront about visa changes. – mts Dec 27 '16 at 12:36
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    Uh, the Canadian ETA has been required from March 2016, it has not just been introduced - I had to get one for travel to Vancouver in May 2016. – Moo Dec 27 '16 at 13:07
  • The ETA also isn't a visa, its a travel authorisation required only if you travel to, from or via Canada by air. Its entirely separate to any visa requirements (I didn't need a visa, did need an ETA). – Moo Dec 27 '16 at 13:09
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You are wholly and fully responsible for any entry or travel requirements put in place by your destination or transit countries. The airline may remind you and assist you, but they are not in any way responsible for informing you of any requirements.

As an aside, the eTA was not just introduced 7 weeks ago, its been in place since March 2016 and was advertised from early 2015 - you could apply for an eTA first in August 2015, well ahead of the requirement deadline.

The eTA is also not a visa, it is a travel authorisation which is required if you wish to travel to, from or via Canada by air only. It is in addition to any visa requirements.

  • Great, +1. Only isn't it written "eTA" for Canada, instead of "ETA"?! (For Australia it's "ETA" apparently.) – mts Dec 27 '16 at 13:23
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    @HenningMakholm in the case if the eTA and the ESTA, you are required to have them even if you do not need a visa and only fly domestic (eg Vancouver to Toronto). So its not a visa, its a travel authority. – Moo Dec 27 '16 at 13:48
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    @Moo Not correct. eTA only applies to those who do not need a visa, and secondly it only needs to be valid on the day you enter Canada, just like ESTA in the US – Crazydre Dec 27 '16 at 17:20
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    @Moo eTA and ESTA have no relevance to domestic flights, but only to international flights arriving to Canada or the US respectively. – Michael Hampton Dec 27 '16 at 18:29
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    @Moo: who checked it? TSA has no means nor responsibility to check ESTA. – George Y. Dec 27 '16 at 20:53

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