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I am an Indian businessman and a frequent traveller. Have travelled to USA a couple of times in the past. My USA visa has expired. Now I need to visit Iran on business and afterwards to apply for a USA visitor visa for my future travel to USA.

Will I have any problem in getting USA visa because of a short business trip to Iran?

  • Export of textiles – user54865 Dec 15 '16 at 15:41
  • Personal business – user54865 Dec 15 '16 at 16:16
  • @pnuts: that looks like an answer (+1). Maybe add that there is no ban for entering US for people who visited Iran. It only affects people from VWP countries who can't use ESTA anymore, but OP is not getting it anyway. – George Y. Dec 16 '16 at 4:45
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    It is kind-of duplicate of travel.stackexchange.com/questions/64846/… - but not exact, because in the other question the OP already has US visa. The answer however seem to be the same. – George Y. Dec 17 '16 at 1:37
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I visited Iran last year, shortly before the US introduced these new rules, and as such my friend who's wedding I attended has posted a lot of information about it, as several of the guests are affected as they've tried to go to the US.

Short answer - you won't necessarily have any problems.

Long answer - those of us who previously could use the VWP and get an ESTA are no longer able to, but must instead apply for a B1/B2. So this is now the expected route for applications.

As a result, you're likely to have an interview for the visa, and they'll naturally have some questions about your trip. In my case, I can provide evidence and photos to show I was a tourist, and in your case, if you can explain your trip to their satisfaction, that's probably the limit of the 'issues' you may experience.

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  • Actually everyone gets interviewed, as I understand it, with the exception of children and diplomatic visa renewals. – phoog Dec 20 '16 at 23:29
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    @phoog There is an interview waiver program for people renewing US visas. It's likely that he won't have to go in for an interview. Such a program exists in many countries, though the exact requirements differ a bit from country to country. – Michael Hampton Dec 21 '16 at 0:00
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In theory, it should not make matters more difficult. In practice, it will depend on the person you get at the interview, as well as your overall appearance

On the Norwegian version of Flyertalk, at least one person (ethnic Norwegian/Scot) has reported about the interviewer clearly not liking the fact that he was in Iran, grilling him intensely regarding the visit, and subsequently refusing him a visa. The next time, however, he apparently got it after some questions about what he did there and what sorts of people he dealt with.

In general, it is a fact that dressing well and having a stable job will go a long way.

Expect to be asked about what you did in Iran and whether you dealt with any religious figures. Like I said, they could very well give you a hard time, depending on both who you get at the interview and your overall appearance, but the best thing you can do is be prepared and answer the questions confidently and truthfully

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