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I looked at Round-trip transit through Canada: does it double transit visa costs? as well as https://travel.stackexchange.com/questions/82068/which-layover-airports-give-sight-seeing-without-needing-transit-visa-fees . If I take Istanbul airport as an example it says something called single transit visa and double transit visa but doesn't offer any explanation as to what constitutes a single transit or a double transit visa or how it's applied. For e.g. my visit between the two journeys will be less than a month, approx. 20-25 days. So will I have to spend INR 4100/- or INR 8200/- for the same.

The idea is India - Istanbul (stay in the transit lounge) - Canada

and then back -

Canada - Istanbul (stay in the lounge) - India

Could somebody disambiguate between the two terms and what do they mean ?

  • nope, not planning to leave the airport. I am not sure if I need a transit visa or not if I'm not leaving the transit lounge. I have actually filed a new question to get clarity on that concept as well travel.stackexchange.com/questions/82536/… – shirish Nov 13 '16 at 20:41
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Typically, a single transit visa is for a single journey whereby you enter the country you transit and leave it again, soon. If you want to transit again on your return trip, you will either need a second transit visa or a double-entry (or similar; names may vary) visa.

For example, last year when I took a train tour through Russia, we initially transited Belarus. The tour was destined to end in Moscow; some people decided to take a train back from Moscow via Belarus again; they were notified that they will need a double-entry Belarusian visa. Others flew home from Moscow so they only required single-entry Belarusian visa. The cost of a double-entry was higher than single entry, but less than two single entries iirc.

The exact conditions depend on the countries you’re transiting.

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A "round trip" figures largely in

  • your head: you are going somewhere, and then coming home, and
  • airline pricing, since the whole secret of competitive air travel is pricing discrimination, and a price-insensitive businessman on a two-day junket is most easily distinguished from a highly price-sensitive backpacker by the structure of their journeys.

To customs enforcement, you enter their country and you leave it, and that's all. Whether you are going somewhere or coming back or just wandering is something they neither know nor care.

  • This does not really answer the question. – lambshaanxy Nov 13 '16 at 20:07
  • @pnuts The OP is asking whether he needs a single or double transit visa, and I don't see an answer to that? – lambshaanxy Nov 13 '16 at 22:23

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