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For domestic flights in the US, when your boarding pass is scanned at the gate, does the gate agent make sure that pass was also scanned at security?

closed as unclear what you're asking by JonathanReez, Giorgio, Jan, Willeke, Fattie Oct 26 '16 at 21:28

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    How could they? I might have one boarding pass from SFO-ORD and another from ORD-MSP. The second one certainly wouldn't have been scanned at security. And if I miss my connection and get issued a third boarding pass for a later flight, that one won't be scanned at security either. – Zach Lipton Oct 26 '16 at 20:38
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    That said, it sounds like there's a "real question" lurking beneath this one. It would help if you tell us what you're actually trying to accomplish. – Zach Lipton Oct 26 '16 at 20:39
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    The "real question" is "how can I avoid being price-gouged to change my itinerary when all I want to do is purchase an additional ticket that is fairly cheap, and skip the last leg of my original itinerary?" The airline wants to charge me $1000 to cancel the last leg of my flight so I can buy another ticket, and has also advised me that if I just go ahead and buy another and plan to not get on the plane for the last leg, their software will catch the duplicate booking and cancel my entire original itinerary. – Flyer1234 Oct 26 '16 at 20:43
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    That's an extremely different question. I suggest you ask that one :) – Zach Lipton Oct 26 '16 at 20:46
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    I think you need to ask the real question. Security scans are unlikely to be an issue. For example, you could have booked SFO-ORD on one airline, ORD-MSP on a separate ticket, and have printed your own boarding passes. Airline booking systems are much more likely to catch you. – Patricia Shanahan Oct 26 '16 at 20:59
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Except for one experimental program, the two aren't connected. CAT/BPSS is still being 'tested'. (Note, I'd totally forgotten about this so after following up, it appears that even CAT/BPSS is not real-time, it's merely a better document verification system.)

The scanners TSA currently uses validate some facets of the boarding pass, but are otherwise isolated.

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    Note that some non-US airports do have this though, eg the Conformance / Ready To Fly system used by BA at Heathrow (LHR) Terminal 5 – Gagravarr Oct 27 '16 at 9:47

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