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We received an invitation to an academic conference in the USA. A senior member of my group was supposed to attend and now he can't and want me to go instead. I explained that I also can't attend due to some commitments but he did not receive this well and insisted I should apply for a visa and attend the conference. I will be risking my job if I do not attend.

I want to check if there is a way I can apply for a visa that I know would not be accepted or that will take long to be processed (the event is 4 months from now). I thought of applying for a visa without providing any supporting documents for example, but I could be lucky (unlucky) and my visa accepted. I am also curious whether this will have negative impact on my future travels to the US or other European countries.

(Note: I am Chinese)

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    Getting your visa application denied will effect future applications for visas. Better to talk with the senior member or their boss. – user13044 Oct 4 '16 at 0:32
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    @Joernano not a dupe as the OP in the other question had a valid visa already. – JonathanReez Oct 4 '16 at 15:50
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    I would migrate this to Workplace. SE, although the suggested solution is in fact a travel question. – JonathanReez Oct 4 '16 at 15:51
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    This is really really silly. Forget it. – Fattie Oct 4 '16 at 16:39
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A visa refusal from the US will indeed have an impact on your future travel. For example, if you ever change your citizenship - or US extends VWP to include your country - you will not be allowed to enter US without visa due to your refusal. Also some countries ask if you ever been refused a visa to any country, and this is generally perceived negatively.

In your case the simplest approach should be to prevent the issue altogether by having an honest talk to your boss and team. In most organizations there would be people willing to jump hoops to visit US - it is much easier for your boss to send to US someone who actually want to go there. I assume since it was possible to switch from another person to you, making another switch should also be possible as well.

However if you still decide to do it as you plan, the best approach would be to hold until the last minute, and submit the incomplete paperwork (a wrong passport - internal passport, or an expired one), so your case is returned without being processed, and you can't resubmit in time.

Be aware that any strategy might have consequences for your job, because your employer would lose the opportunity to visit the conference, as well as lose money. If you're refused a visa for no obvious reason, and the company planned to send you to US in future, this may cost your job too. Or the above, for example - a visa refusal is understandable, but most bosses would probably not like having an employee who can't even submit a proper passport with visa application. Thus politely and honestly raising the issue is probably the best solution.

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    My concern is that it may have even worse job consequences. Employing someone who doesn't want to go to US is reasonable. Employing someone who can't even submit a proper passport with visa application, and as a result cost the company the lost opportunity (missed conference) as well as lost money, is not going to be held in high regard. But at least he won't also have a refusal in his record with that. – George Y. Oct 4 '16 at 0:43
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    And then there is always the chance of the company finding out that you played this trick. That will have consequences too. – Jan Doggen Oct 4 '16 at 15:26
  • Yep, by looking here, for example :) – George Y. Oct 4 '16 at 22:58
  • @JanDoggen Oh they will know! If you would send a guy to a conference and he doesn't want to go, but then later agrees and then cocks-up paperwork at last minute.... No need to be Sherlock here... lol – Matas Vaitkevicius Jan 12 '18 at 7:48

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