4

I am planning to apply for a UK Visa being 21 years of age with a job. My Dad would fund the trip. Would I be considered as a dependent child?

I previously had a successful application as a dependent when I was 19 years of age and an undergraduate student, the proof of which I attached in the supporting documents.

  • Also, would I need any supporting documents for myself if my father is funding all the trip by himself? e.g. employment letter or bank statements? – Asad Moeen Aug 4 '16 at 10:19
  • Dependents can be any age where the person is not leading an independent life. Dependent children are up to age 18. – Gayot Fow Aug 4 '16 at 10:26
  • 1
    @AsadMoeen: It sounds rather like you are (and were) a dependent non-child. – Henning Makholm Aug 4 '16 at 10:34
  • 1
    @AsadMoeen: Why would you "answer as a non-dependent child" if you are neither non-dependent nor a child? False answers on visa applications are the surest way to misery and bans known to travel.SE. – Henning Makholm Aug 4 '16 at 10:44
  • 1
    @AsadMoeen: It is not actually clear to me which fields you're speaking about here. Perhaps it would be a good idea to update your question with the exact wording of the questions you don't know how to answer. Also, why are you filling out your father's application? Your question doesn't even make clear whether you're traveling together, what the purpose of the travel you're planning is, or really anything. – Henning Makholm Aug 4 '16 at 10:59
2

Taking your father's application first...

There are two questions...

enter image description here

When the 'Yes' button is clicked, the programme jumps to a pop-up that asks for the children's details. This question is intended to capture ALL of the applicant's dependent children. This helps the ECO understand the applicant's family ties.

The next question is looking for the the applicant's 'Non Dependent Children'. This is intended to capture adults who are travelling with the applicant. Your father's application would fill out this section, including the pop-up.

Eyes wide. Astute observers will notice that the two questions are neither mutually exclusive nor collectively exhaustive); it can get tricky and there's a need to be a little bit careful. The ambiguity is built-in by design.

For your application...

enter image description here

This is where you would list your father's details because he is your sponsor.

For both applications...

There's a question about who is travelling with applicant...

enter image description here

Both applications should select 'Yes' and fill out the associated pop-up. The pop-up does not ask for the other person's GWF number, also built-in ambiguity. So "best practices" is to use the remarks section to link everyone's GWF numbers together so they can tell it's a family group application.

  • 1
    Thank you so much. So the definition of a dependent in this case is someone who is under 18? I'm asking this because my brother just graduated at 20 but he is jobless and still depends on my Dad for financial needs. What would he be? A dependent or a non-dependent? Secondly, in our individual applications, would we need some supporting documents, e.g. Graduation degree or employee letter? – Asad Moeen Aug 4 '16 at 16:35
  • You can use the guidance to see what evidence the dependents should include :) – Gayot Fow Aug 4 '16 at 16:38
  • But I guess you just advised me to fill up the application as a non-dependent instead of a dependent? @GayotFow - Your help in this regard would be appreciated. And what would be the status of my brother? – Asad Moeen Aug 5 '16 at 7:48
  • @AsadMoeen by definition you cannot claim to be a child. You can be a dependent in the say way as a child or spouse, but you do not fit the other categories – Gayot Fow Aug 5 '16 at 9:09
  • And what about my brother who is 20 years old and lives off my father? Can both be dependent just like a child/spouse as we still live with our father and he is the one managing everything for us. In this case we would fill up the dependents box. @GayotFow – Asad Moeen Aug 5 '16 at 9:15

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.