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I, a German citizen, am going to visit the USA as a tourist. I use to smoke cigarillos which were made in Cuba, but bought by me in Germany. Can I bring them with me to the US (with the intent of smoking them there, of course)? And if yes, can I bring them as part of my cabin luggage?

Last I heard the US had some kind of embargo on Cuban products, but I'm not sure about all the intricacies and specificities of that regulation (if it even is still in use).

  • The same brands are made in Dominican Republic too. So find those. Actually the real ones are from D.R. as the growers moved; the government took over the label and continued selling them under the same name, too. – JDługosz Jul 25 '16 at 4:33
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Apparently, you can only import them if you purchased them in Cuba, and carry them with you.

From the CBP web site:

Can I import or bring Cuban cigars into the U.S. for personal use?

Persons authorized to travel to Cuba may purchase alcohol and tobacco products while in Cuba for personal consumption while there. Authorized travelers may return to the United States with up to $100 worth of alcohol or tobacco or a combination of both. Products acquired in Cuba may be in accompanied baggage, for personal use only.

Purchasing Cuban-origin cigars and/or Cuban-origin rum or other Cuban-origin alcohol over the internet or while in a third country (i.e. not Cuba) remains prohibited.

This also applies to non-U.S. citizens who enter the country.

A non-U.S. person (i.e. not a U.S. citizen or resident) arriving in the United States is authorized to import Cuban-origin merchandise, other than tobacco and alcohol, as accompanied baggage provided the merchandise is not in commercial quantities and not imported for resale. See 31 CFR § 515.569. If the non-U.S. person is arriving in the United States from a trip that included travel to Cuba, the person also is authorized to import as accompanied baggage alcohol or tobacco products purchased or otherwise acquired in Cuba with a value not to exceed $100 for personal use only. See 31 CFR § 515.560(c)(3).

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