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Is there any place (easily accessible by someone without a car) to exchange Euros to US dollars in San Francisco other than in the airport?

For example, when I was in Lugano, Switzerland, it was far better for me to exchange the money in Taleda (if I remember correctly the name) which was in the city centre, than in the airport. The gain was significant.

closed as off-topic by David Richerby, JonathanReez, Willeke, CGCampbell, Gayot Fow Jul 3 '16 at 8:04

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions on price-shopping for specific goods or services are off-topic as prices and availability change frequently in many locations. See: What is a shopping question?" – David Richerby, JonathanReez, Willeke, CGCampbell, Gayot Fow
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Most of the time, you will get the best rate and convenience by using an ATM.

Is this not an option?

  • I was planning to bring some Euros with me, but if the best approach is the ATM, then I will bring only a small amount of Euros with me (for the taxi etc.) and do that. – gsamaras Jul 1 '16 at 15:40
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    For taxies in the Euro zone, sure. US Cabbies will not accept Euros in most cases. – Johns-305 Jul 1 '16 at 15:53
  • @gsamaras You'd be better off using a credit card for taxis if you can. Or use Uber which you can get from San Francisco airport if you don't want to use Bart. – Berwyn Jul 1 '16 at 15:54
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    My tip is, use the metro system (called BART) to get from the Airport. It's quick and much cheaper than Taxis, plus None of the classic US traffic jams – Crazydre Jul 1 '16 at 16:44
  • It's amazing how many people don't know this, especially among the crowd who's otherwise well-informed enough to know about SE. – R.. Jul 1 '16 at 20:13
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San Francisco is the major financial center for US-Pacific trade and the many bank branches will exchange your Euros. There's an exchange booth in one of the largest downtown shopping malls (other locations mentioned; I am not affiliated with that link). The problem is that exchange rates are terrible everywhere in the United States. I don't even get a good rate as a relatively high net-worth customer on wire transactions at my regular bank, much less as a tourist walking up.

Your best bet is using your own debit card in an ATM. California used to prohibit ATM fees for ex-USA credit cards. This is no longer true, but some banks will not charge you anyway. (What your home bank does is up to them.) Your second-best bet, depending on risk tolerance for pickpockets, is to get USD in your own country.

  • ATM it is then, since that's seems to be the voice of the people commenting/answering here, thank you Andrew! – gsamaras Jul 3 '16 at 6:52

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