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Last night I booked a room for next weekend in a Holiday Inn. This morning, I got word that my event was moved, so I cancelled the Holiday Inn and booked a room in a hotel closer to the event. I just realized that Holiday Inn will charge me for the first night, as part of the cancellation.

This is on me -- I'm pretty sure they gave warning both when I booked and when I cancelled, and I just didn't pay close enough attention because I was in a rush (and because I'm used to hotels that allow cancellations up to a night or two beforehand). Still, is there anything I can try to get the charge removed? Has anyone had any success with this?

Update To update: I phoned the hotel, and got transferred, transferred, and transferred again to a nice lady called Holly, who tried to put me on hold and accidentally disconnected me, but promptly called back, all apologies, and put me on hold for a long time, while (she told me) she got transferred three times, until she finally got a gentleman who looked it up and said that, in spite of the clear message in my email, I was not actually charged the cancellation fee. So I thanked Holly very much, and now we will see if that is actually true. (update again It was true and I wasn't charged.)

Conclusion, always worth making the phone call

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    I doubt it. Rates are typically lower if you take non-cancellable, and there is a price to pay for that after all. Otherwise, everybody would do it. - if you are an IHG gold or platinum member, you might be able to sweet-talk them into a personal exception, 'for a good customer'... but don't hold your breath. – Aganju Jun 14 '16 at 4:02
  • I'd say it depends on how you booked the hotel. With a third-party booking (where you paid your money to the third-party), the odds are pretty low. If you booked directly and are cancelling a very short time later, it's wroth asking. I might try calling the hotel's front desk directly instead of reservations. – Zach Lipton Jun 14 '16 at 5:52
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There is nothing you can really do about it. The charge is contractual. You accepted it while booking the room. You might look into the terms and conditions as there might be some exceptions like death of a relative that would allow lifting this charge but I doubt that an event move will be enough.

As someone mentioned in a comment, you can also try to speak with their Customer service if you are a loyal Customer but again, I don't see them doing an exception for an event move...

  • That's what I was afraid of. I doubt I qualify as a good enough customer - I stay in hotels in the Holiday Inn range a half-dozen times a year, but don't go out of my way for Holiday Inns, so probably have only been in them once a year or so for the past few years. Oh, well. Lesson learned. – iayork Jun 14 '16 at 10:44
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    To update: I phoned the hotel, and got transferred, transferred, and transferred again to a nice lady called Holly, who tried to put me on hold and accidentally disconnected me, but promptly called back, all apologies, and put me on hold for a long time, while (she told me) she got transferred three times, until she finally got a gentleman who looked it up and said that, in spite of the clear message in my email, I was not actually charged the cancellation fee. So I thanked Holly very much, and now we will see if that is actually true. – iayork Jun 15 '16 at 1:33
  • Congrats sir, great job! – Olielo Jun 15 '16 at 6:56
  • You may send an email to hotel explaining that event was canceled so you had to cancel the room (with proof). There is a slight chance that you may get refunded partially. Just ask.! – pbu May 25 '17 at 14:49

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