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Are there any advantages or disadvantages of having triple citizenship (or beyond that) that is not the case with dual citizenship? Does the third citizenship add another dimension to the case in any way, or is it basically the same as dual citizenship with more variables?

Edit: Maybe I was not clear, let me rephrase this. Going from one citizenship to two brings along a lot of things. My question was, does anything else arise when getting the third citizenship that was not the case when getting the second citizenship? If it's the same concept like getting to more countries visa-free, it's just another variable. I'm looking for advantages/disadvantages different from the dual citizenship case.

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    Maybe making you open to conscription by an additional military ;-) – user13044 May 27 '16 at 6:31
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    @Tom I know this is irrelevant to TSE, but out of curiosity, what if you're a citizen of 2 countries that are on opposite sides of a war, and you are conscripted by both? :o – Joel Damien May 27 '16 at 8:17
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    @JoelDamien - do your best not to set foot in either country until after the war is over. Yeah I know there would be legal consequences, but probably better than shooting at yourself. – user13044 May 27 '16 at 8:25
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    You're more likley to be interned than conscripted, if they know about your dual citizenship. – CMaster May 27 '16 at 9:22
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    If you read the Wikipedia page on Multiple Citizenship the one overriding factor which is repeatedly stated is that citizenship and nationality are determined per country. This question is way too complicated and broad to be answerable by us in this format. The advantages or disadvantages are completely related to what citizenship's and/or nationalities are held by the individual on a case by case basis. VtC as too broad – CGCampbell May 27 '16 at 16:05
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Are there advantages to treble nationality that are specific to a travel site?

Yes, if you travel a lot to places that require registration or visas, then this question is topical without the need for an exact enumeration of which nationalities are concerned.

By and large it can open more places to visit without needing a visa. Taking my own case as an example, I can get in to about 19 different time zones without a visa. Not every country in those 19 time zones mind you, but at least one. A big thrill is that my children qualify for the Naval Academy as university in three different countries because they also hold those nationalities.

Not in my case, but depending upon where your treble nationalities are, you may be violating a local law about having multiple nationalities.

The big downside is that one of those countries has some awkward tax issues that arise when a national is in a 'foreign' country, and this tends to limit how open someone can be about their nationalities.

I have already served in the Navy of one of those countries and am not eligible for conscription, so I can bypass those issues (if there are any).

There is also a lot of extra paperwork involved in tax reporting (for those countries that require it).

Another downside is that those passports expire and it's expensive keeping them up-to-date. I qualify for a 4th passport, but have opted not to pursue it because [1] it does not add to the places I can get to; and [2] the on-going expense of passport applications; and [3] I could not pass the nationality to my children.

I expect at some point the Department of Homeland Security will start some programme that makes it awkward to have passports for countries they deem to be inimical to their own interests, and that would be another disadvantage. The US, for example, always adds an extra layer of inquiry whenever I arrive there; I expect this to get more intrusive as time goes on. It's not that I have something to hide, but it's an unwelcome consumption of time.

My overall advice to people in the same situation is that if they can pass their additional nationality to their children or if it significantly broadens their visa-free access they should pursue the paperwork and get it done. I have also advised Americans and Canadians to carefully check if there's a (for example) Lithuanian in their family tree.

  • "...at some point" - hasn't the US already done this, to a degree, with the Iranian (etc) dual-national rules that recently came into force? If you're otherwise eligible for a visa waiver, having the additional citizenship puts you back a step compared to only having the one status. – Andrew May 27 '16 at 18:26
  • @Andrew, those rules affect people who must get ESTA or visas or some other permission to enter the US. The rules have not yet affected multi-nationals who carry a US passport but none of the other countries listed like Iran, fingers crossed :) This condition is what's being alluded to in my answer, i.e., they are going to make things difficult for EVERYONE... Including US nationals. – Gayot Fow May 27 '16 at 19:26
  • Aha, I misread you - I thought you were saying "[having three third-country passports means] the US always adds an extra layer of enquiry..." - didn't realise you meant as a US passport holder. – Andrew May 27 '16 at 21:27
  • @Andrew, US IO's can get very shirty about these things as it is. Heaven help us if there's some sort of new jingoistic law imposed. – Gayot Fow May 27 '16 at 21:57
  • Maybe I was not clear, let me rephrase this. Going from one citizenship to two brings along a lot of things. My question was, does anything else arise when getting the third citizenship that was not the case when getting the second citizenship? If it's the same concept like getting to more countries visa-free, it's just another variable. I'm looking for advantages/disadvantages different from the dual citizenship case. – downhand May 29 '16 at 9:40

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