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I have 28,000 miles on Skymiles, but will be flying almost exclusively AirFrance (8-10 transatlantic flights/year) for the next year or two. Is there a big difference in the amount of points AirFrance gives to Skymiles vs FlyingBlue for the same segments? Should I switch?

closed as primarily opinion-based by choster, Mark Mayo May 12 '16 at 2:00

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    Comparing frequent flyer programs is a very difficult art, but a few points to take into account: your specific travel patterns (which flights, which class, which fares); your current FF status; your residency; any credit cards you use and/or could get to accumulate miles; what is important for you here: status, or awards? the type of awards you intend to redeem (airline, destinations, classes...)... – jcaron May 11 '16 at 13:11
  • Sorry, but asking questions like 'should I switch?' are subjective, and we specifically ask not to ask those (see help center). I'm putting on hold for now, but please do edit and it can be reopened if valid. – Mark Mayo May 12 '16 at 2:00
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Flying Blue is not a generous program particularly if you have the misfortune to be travelling in economy class. In the UK it is sometimes nicknamed "Flying Poo".

The main advantage is that you will have Flying Blue Gold after only thirty individual flights per year. (I assume you mean "8-10 return trips per year", if you are only doing 8 flights in total it is probably better to forget about frequent flier schemes and just take the cheapest flight.) Once you factor in connections and the odd unexpected trip the number of sectors will soon surpass that. Flying Blue Gold is the mid tier that gives you access to a range of mediocre-to-poor lounges, and SkyPriority, allowing you to skip the queues (or rather, join different queues). These benefits apply on Delta as well as Air France and the rest of SkyTeam. To get this through Delta would usually take more individual flights and now a minimum spend threshold.

The disadvantages are that redemptions are expensive in both miles and money (fees will run into the hundreds of euros), it is very hard to generate miles through alternative routes such as credit card spending, there's not much in the way of dedicated customer support, and you'll be at the back of the upgrade queue on Delta domestic flights.

To be honest it's much of a muchness really but I doubt there is anything compelling you to switch away from SkyMiles. Air France remains a tier 1 partner of SkyMiles and most of their flights will earn miles with Delta.

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