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I'm just wondering if i can bring a 37pcs used jewelry from my mom going back to canada? I'm a permanent residence in Canada. Do I need a receipt or anything to show them even if its used already and Its a long time ago since my mom bought it. And what if some of the jewelry is wear by me and some are on my handcarry.? What are the requirements or need to do if I want to bring jewelries going back in canada?

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    Jewelry is very broad term. The number of pieces is not so important as their value . So does their age and if they are being used is not a consideration for value ( it's not snickers or electronics ) Check here for tax estimation . Diamonds bare also different rule than Gold for example. Narrow down the specifics in the question or contact the customs directly. As it is now this question is really broad. – Obmerk Kronen Apr 17 '16 at 2:52
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The Government of Canada's website has the following to say:

Jewelry or precious ornaments

Officers may ask you questions about these items during your customs interview. Make sure you describe these items on your list of goods. To avoid delays at customs when you enter Canada:

  • On your list of goods, use the wording from your insurance policy or jeweler’s appraisal.
  • Have photographs of the items.
  • Know how much you paid for the items or have a receipt showing how much you paid. You do not need to pay duty or tax on family heirlooms.

I have highlighted the part that may be relevant to you; but 37 pieces (at least to my eye) does seem a bit excessive unless there is a reason for it - for example, it is for your wedding.

I recommend getting a jeweler's appraisal (in English) for your items. Normally, jewelry worn is exempt from tax / import duties.

In all cases make sure you declare the items in your landing papers not doing so (and then being caught) will cause you all kinds of problems including confiscation of the items and a hefty fine.

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  • Declare and the worst that can happen is that you have to pay duty/tax. You can usually even accept a duty/tax bill in customs and later challenge that to have it reduced or even waived. – Bent Jan 24 '18 at 16:15

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