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When buying flights tickets usually buying a one-way flight is very expensive, comparing to flights that have return. In many airline websites there is not an option for planing a whole big trip with many stops.

Let's say I want to travel from Tel Aviv to Paris, Paris to Stockholm and then from Stockholm to Tel Aviv.

In the Norwegian airline website there isn't an option for this type of things. In addition, if I want to take Tel Aviv - Paris flight and Paris - Stockholm flight I will need to pay them separately as one-way trip.

How do I resolve this problem? How do I plan this type of flights? How do I do it traveling with Norwegian airline if there isn't the option on their website? I tried with ElAl airline and it is very expensive for taking a one-way flight at their website (for example Tel Aviv - Paris is very expensive one-way trip).

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Norwegian Air Shuttle specifically only sells point-to-point trips - in practice, this means that rather than making one-way trips artificially expensive (and in exchange maybe having slightly cheaper two-way trips), which is what most airlines do, your itinerary has no effect on the prices. So there is no need to look for a multi-city or two-way option; there isn't one - but rest assured that that doesn't mean that their one-way trips are unnecessarily expensive.

Like Tom, I would recommend checking prices with e.g. Hipmunk, but if Norwegian does serve the involved destinations, you'll see that their "one-way pricing" usually is pretty competitive.

(Disclaimer: I am from Norway, and so I have some interest in promoting Norwegian companies, but I am otherwise unaffiliated with Norwegian Air Shuttle.)

  • Just buy multiple one-way tickets - brilliant! ;) – thebiggestlebowski Aug 16 at 14:30
  • @thebiggestlebowski: I realize that my suggestion is identical to the obvious one that the OP wanted to avoid, but the crux of my answer is that their concerns are unwarranted for this particular airline, whose price for a roundtrip or multi-city trip always is equal to the sum of the one-way prices for its individual legs (and that unlike most airlines, where one-way trips are artificially expensive and roundtrips are a bit cheaper, this airline doesn't do such price differentiation). – Aasmund Eldhuset Aug 16 at 17:27
  • Your answer was useful and appreciated. I was laughing at myself for not thinking of this ;) – thebiggestlebowski Aug 17 at 21:01
  • Ah, thanks - it just sounded like sarcasm at first :D – Aasmund Eldhuset Aug 18 at 3:13
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A fair number of airline websites offer what is called 'multi-city' booking/search option. You can create all sorts of routings, but need to consider that the airline you are searching might not serve all the city pairs.

You maybe be able to use the alliance websites to create a multi-carrier itinerary.

The OTA (online travel agencies) may offer a multi-city option that can stitch together different airlines.

A tradional travel agent can also stitch together itineraries using multiple airlines.

BUT .... the airfares these last three use may be related to one way fares, because fare rules are often not combinable across two unrelated airlines.

  • Could you give me examples of websites that can be used? – Pichi Wuana Apr 16 '16 at 14:06

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