7

UPDATE:

I thought you would like to hear an update. After finding more proof of friendship, and explaining all bank deposits, the visa was granted in a new application through the same means, and she is now in the country. So I guess it answers that question regarding authenticity of the original refusal, although that probably doesn't put you at ease regarding UKVI's competence.


My Chinese girlfriend was refused a visa to visit the UK for two reasons. Her bank account had large separate deposits of money from me and her family into her account, which were not explained. So she will write about where these are from. Is that enough?

Also, in her application, she stated I would cover her travel costs. She included my bank statements, a letter from me inviting her, my personal details, my passport, and pictures of us together. But the visa officer wasn't satisfied the relationship was genuine. What more can we do?

Below is a copy of what's stated below 'The decision', typos included, in her refusal notice. No third-party agency was used for her application. All completed using the official website, and visit to official UK Visa office.

I have refused your application for a visit visa because I am not satisfied that you meet the requirements of paragraph(s) 4.2, of Appendix V: Immigration Rules for Visitors because:

You have applied for a leave to enter to visit the UK for 33 for tourism purpose.

You state that you are employed with ******** and that you earn ***** RMB per annum. In support of your application you have provided evidence of bank savings with recent large cash deposits of *****RMB in October 2015, and a fixed deposit certificate of ***** RMB opened on 28 October 2015. It is not clear from the papers submitted how these funds were derived, or they are genuinely available to you to spend on your short visit. You have also stated that your travel, maintenance and accommodation costs will be met by ****. However, I am not satisfied that: Your sponsor has a genuine professional relationship or personal relationship with you V4.3(a).

Because of this, I am not satisfied you have sufficient funds available to cover your costs whilst in the UK without working or accessing public funds. Your application for a visit visa has therefore been refused under paragraph V4.3 (a)/(b)/(c)

Visa Refusal

  • 1
    The rejection will have cited some specific bits of regulation, we need to know those exact reasons to be able to help – Gagravarr Nov 13 '15 at 23:50
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    Please include the exact refusal notice given. – CMaster Nov 14 '15 at 8:44
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    Press "edit" above and add the information to the body of your question. – nkjt Nov 14 '15 at 12:04
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    And that is the full notice of refusal? Should be quite possible to work on, but it seems your girlfriend may need to read the offical guideance more carefully. – CMaster Nov 14 '15 at 13:14
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    Did your girlfriend hire some third-party agent to take care of her application? – Relaxed Nov 15 '15 at 0:49
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Let's get something straight from the beginning... This is a horrible refusal notice. I'm actually embarrassed just looking at it. The formulae is bizarre and doesn't show up anywhere in the operations manual. This immediately raises the question of authenticity.

User 'Relaxed' (to whom thanks) asks if a third-party handled the application (like a travel agent or lawyer or visa specialist). If so, there's a really good chance your gf has been scammed. Or she is scamming you. I would treat both alternatives as possibilities in the first instance.

To find out for certain, she should send the refusal notice along with a strenuous complaint to UKVI's head office (Lunar House, 40 Wellesley Rd, Croydon CR9 2BY, United Kingdom) with a copy to the Home Secretary (2 Marsham St, London SW1P 4DF, United Kingdom). The complaint should explain that the refusal notice is gibberish and hence she cannot understand it (there's no such thing as V 4.3 (a)/(b)/(c) for example, so how is she supposed to know what to do? the last sentence of paragraph two is an egregious non-sequitur). They will confirm that you are being scammed OR draft you a proper notice. As a sponsor, you can also show the notice to your MP's caseworker (nothing will come of it, but they will send you a letter making you feel better).

Bottom line: Scam. That's my answer at the moment. In the case that your gf's refusal is in fact a UKVI product (which is too horrible to even think about), you can come back and ask a new question or revise this question and ping the people who left comments.

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    To make it clear, when @gayotfow says "scam" he means that the application was never sent to the visa office, and that this rejection comes from the agent or similar. It uses some of the same language as genuine rejections, but doesn't read quite right (hence the "is that all?" comments) – CMaster Nov 15 '15 at 8:17
  • Thank you for your response. The application was done online using the official government website. Upon completion, she was invited to the UK visa office in Shenzhen, China, which she did do, taking her documents and getting her finger-print scanned. So I have no reason to believe it was a scam. – simowhituk Nov 15 '15 at 10:24
  • @simowhituk, did you attend the VFS submission in Shenzhen? – Gayot Fow Nov 15 '15 at 15:34
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    @simowhituk you might want to consider verifying independently then. I'll have to stand on this answer until you hear back from the Home Office. – Gayot Fow Nov 15 '15 at 21:59
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    I thought you would like to hear an update. After finding more proof of friendship, and explaining all bank deposits, visa was accepted in a new application through the same means, and she is now in the country. So I guess it answers that question regarding authenticity of the original refusal, although that probably doesn't put you at ease regarding UKVI's competency. – simowhituk Dec 20 '15 at 18:58

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