4

Best explained with an example:

  • Enter Belarus (let's say October 1). 30 days visa free
  • Cross to Russia (October 15).

Edit: emphasising "visa free" period, e.g. for CIS nationals, Turks etc.

Would that person have to leave Russia on or before Oct 30? Or do they get 30 days for Russia too?

  • 2
    @GayotFow Or another similar situation: If you enter the USA under the Visa Waiver Program and leave to visit neighbouring countries like Canada or Mexico, the clock for the 90 days granted in the USA continue to run, even if you are staying in a different country. It would not surprise me if some of the former Soviet Union countries had similar arrangements between them. – Tor-Einar Jarnbjo Oct 21 '15 at 15:54
  • @AndrewLazarus that could well be. I'm not omnipotent though, I go through with a Russian passport and don't always learn how it works with foreigners :) Let's learn together! – Gayot Fow Oct 21 '15 at 15:59
  • @Tor-EinarJarnbjo, yes there is something like that with Kazakhstan, but Russia goes country by country for those things, there's no overall CIS treaty that I'm aware of... – Gayot Fow Oct 21 '15 at 16:03
  • @AndrewLazarus: spot on – tanerkay Oct 21 '15 at 22:12
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    Essentially, it is quite similar to the CTA between the UK and Ireland: while you're formally allowed a certain number of days for each country separately, there is no reliable legally accepted method to prove on which particular date you crossed the boundary between BY and RU. Therefore, speaking of your example, exiting after Oct 30 will land you in trouble. – ach Oct 21 '15 at 22:56
2

You haven't specified if you have Russian visa too or country of your citizenship - formally, you have to obtain separate visas in both countries. But there is no passport control on the border between Belarus and Russia (only random checks), so I think on departure from Russia only first entry stamp date (the date you've entered Belarus) will be taken into account.

UPD: Answer from US Embassy on similar question on stackexchange - Do I need a visa to visit Belarus if I have a Russian visa?

For boarding the train or plane you have to show passport with valid visas. There is no passport check inside the train when it passes Belarus/Russia border. Flights between Belarus and Russia are considered domestic.

UPD2: There is a bunch of different rules for different countries even from CIS bloc and I cannot find any clear information about such case neither on Belarus foreign affairs ministry site, nor on the Russian one. But I suggest a solution: you may register as soon as your arrive to Russia - it's not obligatory for citizens of some countries, and for others your hotel or host have to do it for you. Ask to get the paper with this registration date and you could show it on exit border as a proof that you stay in Russia from this date and had a right to stay for number of days. According to this you even have to keep this paper with you until you leave the country.

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    Checks can be in trains or planes/ – VMAtm Oct 21 '15 at 17:01
  • @Willeke there is answer from US Embassy on similar question on stackexchange: travel.stackexchange.com/questions/24684/…. – Sergey Rybakov Oct 21 '15 at 17:16
  • @VMAtm for boarding the train or plane you have to show passport with valid visas. There is no passport check inside the train when it passes Belarus/Russia border. Flights between Belarus and Russia are considered domestic. – Sergey Rybakov Oct 21 '15 at 17:24
  • @trampam: no visas involved. This question relates to those who can stay in the country/ies for a visa free period of 30 days (or in some cases 60 or 90 days) – tanerkay Oct 21 '15 at 22:07
  • @yurtan I've proposed a solution in edited answer, but it's not a well-tried way and depends on many factors – Sergey Rybakov Oct 22 '15 at 7:24

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